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The Health of People with Disease: The point of view of health psychology

Posted in Science & Technology, Politics & Society
Sep 28, 2017

Healthy aging

Department of Psychology colloquium
J. Pais Ribeiro, PhD, College of Psychology, University of Porto, Portugal

When:  Thursday, Sept. 28 at 3 pm
Where
:  Arts 153
Info: Peter Grant

In developed countries, many people live with a diagnosed chronic disease or condition that needs continuous or frequent treatment. Health, including mental health, is important to deal with in these kinds of situations. Ribiero will summarize the literature on this topic and present some of his recent research. The emphasis will be on ways to promote the health and quality of life of people with a chronic disease/condition. Better health means that everyday life is easier and better for such people.

 

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