Graduate Students

Elyn Achtymichuk-Hardy

Ph.D. program

Elyn is interested in culture and gender in both literature and film. Her current research is on the legacy of Cold War anxiety on the James Bond franchise, with respect to the way the "Bond formula" has evolved—or not—in terms of fear, sexuality, and racial representations. Her theoretical apparatus makes use of affect in relation to a kind of catharsis of anxiety which is achieved through the expression and production of societal fears. She has also delivered papers on the economics of Lord of the Rings and gender in Harry Potter. If she had spare time, she might coach high school debaters, collect vinyl records, or perhaps watch Lethal Weapon repeatedly (read: obsessively).

Email:  eda649@mail.usask.ca

Robin Adair

Ph.D. program

In his dissertation, Robin uses Maurice Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology as a lens to examine Virginia Woolf's experimental prose writing, particularly in the context of her involvement with the lives and artistic practices of the Bloomsbury group. Robin is a practicing visual artist and art educator. Visit  www.liddedcups.com to see some of his recent projects.

Nicole Atkings

M.A. program

Nicole's area of study is science fiction, with a focus on the representation of gender through language. She's currently working on a thesis, supervised by Dr. Ann Martin, entitled "The Fantastic Nature of 'Sex':Exploring the Implications of Gendered AI Computer Systems in Science Fiction."

Nicole is also a research assistant on the Cantebury Tales Project, headed by Dr. Peter Robinson, and a self-proclaimed "secret medievalist."

Email: nicole.atkings@usask.ca

Jillian Baker

Ph.D. program

Jillian is a Graduate Teaching Fellow and a Research Fellow with the Interdisciplinary Centre for Culture and Creativity (ICCC). Her research revolves around ethical editorial practices as they pertain to autobiographical works, with a particular focus on the writing of Indigenous authors. Her doctoral research, under the supervision of Dr. Nancy Van Styvendale aims at creating an online publication environment for the dissemination of voices from marginalized communities. 

Email: jmb408@mail.usask.ca

Amanda Burrows

Ph.D. program

Amanda is interested in medieval literature with a focus on Middle English romances. She received her B.A. from the University of Toronto and her M.A. from Wilfrid Laurier University.

Mabiana Camargo

Ph.D. program

Mabiana is a third-year Ph.D. student from Brazil. She is interested in feminist Speculative Fiction, specifically, the works by the Canadian author Margaret Atwood. In her research, she plans to investigate the conditions of sexuality and femininity in the dystopic / post-apocalyptic worlds of some of Atwood's last novels. She works as a research assistant for Professor Dr. Wendy Roy who is also her supervisor.

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Tara Chambers

Ph.D. program

Tara is a U of S Teacher-Scholar Doctoral Fellow, and SSHRC Doctoral Fellow specializing in Renaissance literature. Currently she is a Sessional Instructor at Thompson Rivers University, her undergraduate Alma Mater, in Kamloops British Columbia. Tara received her M.A. from the University of Saskatchewan for her work on the "Februarie Eclogue" of Edmund Spenser's The  Shepheardes Calender . Tara’s doctoral research, under the supervision of Ron W. Cooley, Professor Emeritus, focuses on John Milton’s republican poetics and the politics of  Paradise Lost.

Email: tara.chambers@usask.ca

Lindsay Church

MA Program 

Lindsay is a first year M.A. Project student. She received her B.A. (Honours) in English from Vancouver Island University. Fascinated by the intersections of literature, history, and popular culture, she intends to focus her research on the use of medieval and early modern magic and alchemical concepts within twenty and twenty-first century fantasy literature.

Kyle Dase

Ph.D. program

Kyle is a Doctoral Candidate currently in the fourth year of his programme of study. He holds a BA and MA in English literature from the U of S, as well as an MSc in Digital Humanities from the KU Leuven, Belgium. His research interests include late medieval and early renaissance studies, textual editing, medieval and renaissance tropes and allusions in new media, and digital humanities. His dissertation explores the social nature of John Donne’s Verse Epistles and investigates the social network of Donne’s correspondence under the supervision of Professors Brent Nelson and Peter Robinson. His research is funded by a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Joseph-Armand Bombardier Doctoral Fellowship.

Email: kyle.dase@usask.ca

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Amanda Dawson

MFA program

Amanda Dawson is a first year MFA in Writing student. She has a Bachelor of Education from the University of Alberta, and her writing projects focus primarily on the genre of speculative fiction, with an emphasis on fantasy and science fiction.

Mark Doerksen

Ph.D. program

Mark is a Ph.D. candidate in the department, having received his M.A. in Medieval Studies from the Centre for Medieval Studies at the University of Toronto. His area of study includes Anglo-Saxon eschatological texts and the theological implications of philology in Anglo-Saxon religious poetry. He is currently working on his dissertation under Saint Thomas More College's Dr. Michael Cichon on the philological relationship between Anglo-Saxon eschatological poetry and the Germanic oral tradition.

Contact: mdd228@mail.usask.ca

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Sarah Ens

MFA program

Sarah Ens is a writer and editor originally from rural Manitoba. Her poetry has been published in literary journals such as Prairie Fire, Arc Poetry Magazine, Contemporary Verse 2Poetry Is Dead, and  Room magazine. In 2019, she won The New Quarterly's Edna Staebler Personal Essay Contest and placed 2nd in CV2's 2-Day Poem Contest. She also won 1st place in Room's Short Form's Contest in 2018. Her thesis project is a prairie long poem focussing on both human and ornithological migration and her debut collection of poetry entitled The World Is Mostly Sky is forthcoming with Turnstone Press in Spring 2020. Sarah indulges in cat and haiku content at  @balto_thesleddog on Instagram.

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Adam Epp

Ph.D. program

Adam is a third-year Ph.D. student, specializing in Victorian Literature. He is supervised by Dr. Douglas Thorpe. 

Email: ate090@mail.usask.ca

Shane Farris

Ph.D. program

Shane is a second-year Ph.D. student who studies medieval literature and medievalisms past and present. His current research focuses on blending narratology with the digital humanities to study the narratives of the Middle Ages, specifically Middle English outlaw tales. His other research interests include literary theory, codicology and paleography, translation, and semiotics. He works as a research assistant on the Canterbury Tales Project under and is supervised by Dr. Peter Robinson.

Email: shane.farris@usask.ca

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Ryan Gayowski

MA program

Ryan is in the first-year of his M.A. Project. He received his B.A. (Hons) in English from the University of Saskatchewan. His research investigates the relationship between media technology and literature in the early twentieth century with a focus on the work of Virginia Woolf.

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Tea Gerbeza

MFA program

Tea Gerbeza is a poet and paper quilling artist in her first year of the MFA in Writing program. Right now, Tea’s writing focuses on her scoliosis, disability, and the relationship she has with her body. Tea has presented her poetry locally and internationally at conferences like Congress, Southwest Popular/American Culture Association Conference, Literary Eclectic, and Trash Talkin’. You can find her poetry in the Society, Spring, Poetry is Dead, and [SPACE], among others. Her poems have won an Honourable Mention in  Grain's 2019 Short Grain Contest.

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Dara Gerbrandt

MA program

Dara focuses on drama and literature from the early modern period. She tends to keep to a historical approach having had a double minor in CMRS and History. She received her BA here at the U of S.

Federica Giannelli

Ph.D. program

Federica is a doctoral candidate from Italy. She has received a M.A. from the University of Saskatchewan for her work on vampires in contemporary forms of popular culture, and a M.A. in foreign languages from an Italian university. Co-supervised by Dr. Allison Muri and Dr. Lindsey Banco, Federica's doctoral project focuses on the Star Wars franchise. By combining cultural studies and game studies, the purpose of her work is to better understand how culture and cultural production are changing through the advent of new media such as videogames.

Email: federica.giannelli@usask.ca

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Susie Hammond

MFA Program

Susie Hammond is a Seattle-based Canadian, and a second-year MFA in Writing student. She is honoured to be the recipient of the 2019-2020 Dick and Mary Edney Masters Scholarship for International Understanding Through the Humanities and Fine Arts. Dr. Sheri Benning is her poetry thesis supervisor. Her thesis collection, Contours, explores prehistoric cave art’s legacy for contemporary humanity. Her research interest is the
evolutionary origins of human symbolic culture, including language, and its cognitive and social foundations.

Susie’s prior awards include residencies from The Banff Centre and Catalonia’s Faber for the Humanities. She recently presented her work at University of Saskatchewan’s Literary Eclectic conference and was a featured poet at It’s About Time, Seattle’s longest running poetry reading series. Her work is forthcoming in The Community of Writers’ fiftieth anniversary online alumni anthology. She is an editor, arts educator, youth mentor, and member of the Saskatchewan Writer’s Guild.

www.susiehammond.com

susie.hammond@usask.ca

Stephen Hardy

Ph.D. program

Stephan studies relationships between literature and music, and focuses on modern fiction. In 2017 he presented a talk on American author Richard Powers at the International Word and Music Studies conference in Stockholm, Sweden. In 2018 he will teach ENG 114.3 Reading Culture: Literature and Music. He is in his 5th year of the PhD program. His supervisors are Drs. Lindsey Banco and Ray Stephanson.

Email: stephen.hardy@usask.ca

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dee Hobsbawn-Smith

MA program

dee is a poet, essayist, journalist and fiction writer. She earned her MFA in Writing in 2014 at the U of S. Her areas of interest – the literary and literal terroir _of the writing of M.F.K. Fisher, Madeleine Kamman and Anthony Bourdain – evolve from her former career in the culinary world as chef, restaurateur and writer. Her work has appeared in many literary journals, and won the Prairie Fire Press McNally Robinson Booksellers 2018 Creative Nonfiction Writing Contest. She has published seven books. Her first poetry collection, _Wildness Rushing In, was a finalist for the SK Book Awards’ Book of the Year and Best Poetry Collection; Foodshed: An Edible Alberta Alphabet, won three international awards for its examination of the challenges and issues of small-scale sustainable food production. She writes a regular column for Grainews (read by thousands of Western Canadian farmers and ranchers), and is currently the Poetry Editor of Grain magazine, published by the Saskatchewan Writers Guild. As a believer in the intrinsic value of handmade, and in the physicality of the human body as a conduit to creativity, dee cooks, quilts, and runs half-marathons in her spare time.

Robert Imes

Ph.D. program

B.A., M.A. (Alberta)

Supervised by Dr. Brent Nelson, Robert specializes in early modern literature and culture, travel literature, postcolonial studies, and digital humanities.

Email: robert.imes@usask.ca

Vijay Kachru

Ph.D. program

In the first year of her program, Vijay’s area of focus is violence against women during the Partition of India. She has an MFA in Writing from the University of Saskatchewan.

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Michelle Kent

MA program

Michelle is a first-year graduate student in the M.A. Project program. Her research interests are in the expressions of mental health through literature, the navigation of the personal and the public selves through life writing, and in close readings of poetry in almost any time period. Specifically, she is interested in confessional poetry and its cultural implications in mid-twentieth century America. She holds a B.A. Honours in English from the University of Saskatchewan and is a Teaching Assistant for English 110.

Andrej Kiš

Ph.D. progam

Andrej is a second year PhD student specializing in late Victorian and early 20th century British autobiography. His work focuses on place identity in the pastoral landscape in the works of Flora Thompson and James Herriot. He has studied in Austria, and taught English and psychology in Serbia. He is supervised by Dr. Ella Ophir.

Jessica McDonald

Ph.D. program

Jessica specializes in Canadian literature, literary cartography, and postcolonial studies. Her dissertation, supervised by Dr. Lindsey Michael Banco, examines the spatial politics of Douglas Coupland's writing.

Email: jessica.mcdonald@usask.ca

Jade McDougall

Ph.D. program

In the fifth year of her program, Jade's area of study is Indigenous Literatures. She is supervised by Dr. Nancy Van Styvendale and Dr. Allison Muri. 

Email: jade.mcdougall@usask.ca

Kai McKenzie

Ph.D Program 

B.A., University of California
M.A University of Saskatchewan 

Kai is a Dean's Scholar and Teaching Assistant for English 110, Freshman Literature and Composition, where they enjoy developing their teaching practice and employing holistic teaching and learning methods. They are researching the ways in which transgender authors draw on their cultural traditions as sources of integrity and strength and make reference to vibrant transgender communities. They are also concerned to name and understand how embodied knowing and groundedness in nature are foundational for many transgender authors and how transgender identity reveals important aspects of humankind's relationship with nature. Kai's project is supervised by Dr. Ann Martin and Dr. Marie Lovrod.

Tricia Monsour

Tricia Monsour

PhD program 

Tricia is a first-year PhD student with an interest in British Gothic literature from the nineteenth century. She is particularly interested in how women writers used this genre to develop agency. She completed her B.A. Honours at King's University College at the University of Western Ontario.

Ian Moy

Ph.D program

In the third year of his program, Ian is from Ontario, where he earned his B.A. from Trent University and his B.Ed. and M.A. from Queen's University. His focus is Canadian literature, specifically representations of family and culture. He is supervised by Dr. Wendy Roy.

Banjo Olaleye

Ph.D. program

In the third year in the program, Banjo's area of study is Ignatius Sancho and 18th-century literature. He is supervised by Dr. Allison Muri. 

Email: banjo.olaleye@usask.ca

Kayla Penteliuk

M.A. program

Kayla is in her second year of the M.A. Thesis program. She received her B.A. (Hons) from the University of Saskatchewan. Her research explores the connections between Victorian and Modernist literature, particularly through Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s biographical representation in Virginia Woolf’s  Flush: A Biography and the Common Reader series. She currently works as a teaching assistant for Dr. David Parkinson and her proposal “Revising Victorian Biography: Challenging the Modernist Perspective of Elizabeth Barrett Browning” received SSHRC funding for the 2018-2019 academic year. Her supervisor is Dr. Ella Ophir.

Jasmine Redford

M.A. program

Jasmine is a full-time university student at the University of Saskatchewan, as well as a graduate editor for the Canadian Journal of Educational Administration and Policy and a graduate advisor for the University of Saskatchewan Undergraduate Research Journal. In addition, she is a freelance illustrator and is currently working on the artwork, fully hand-painted with inkwash and coffee, for "Siegfried: Dragon Slayer" (Renegade Arts Entertainment). She obtained her BFA, with a major in Visual Arts, from the Emily Carr University in Vancouver, British Columbia, and her BA English Honours at the University of Saskatchewan. Future plans include graduate studies in English literature at the University of Saskatchewan, incorporation of her BFA into her Masters by researching Canadian graphic narratives/comic books, and chasing down the most elusive of all literary creations: the Canadian superhero.

For more, see my profile at the Emily Carr University Alumni Association.

Sam Rezazadeh

M.A. program

This is my first year as a new master's student at the Department of English. I have a B.A. in English language and literature from the Persian Gulf University in Iran, and I graduated from the master's in Teaching English program at the Department of Linguistics at the University of Saskatchewan in July 2017. My passion is teaching in academia and have been fortunate enough to serve as a lecturer at the Linguistics department, activity attendant at the language centre, and teaching/research assistant at the English department.

I am mostly interested in Digital Humanities and the role of new media in our lives. My intended thesis would be on the role of social media in international affairs. The new media has made it possible for the public opinion to engage in dialogues with the political figures through different channels of communication. My project will reveal how politicians negotiate their identities through social media networks when they are dealing with different aspects of international relations, such as nuclear energy, terrorism, or peace keeping. This project is important because it helps to understand a) the role of social media in the creation of public opinion around international affairs issues, and b) the role of social media in international negotiations.

Mari-Lou Rowley

Ph.D. program

As a poet, Mari-Lou’s interest in empathy, intentionality and social media is rooted in her interest in language—how it defines us as a species and constructs us as social and moral beings. The core question of her research is: How are the phenomena of intentionality, embodiment and empathy experienced in social media environments? The focus is on adolescents who are most engaged with these technologies and whose brains and social skills are still developing. Poetry as an arts-based method was used in data sharing and analysis via a secure text-messaging app. The iterative, interactive approach provided rich, layered data, and some surprising results. She is currently completing her dissertation. Mari-Lou received a SSHRC Joseph Armand Bombardier Doctoral Scholarship and a U of S Dean’s Scholarship. She has published nine collections of poetry, most recently Unus Mundus (Anvil Press 2013), which was nominated for three Saskatchewan book Awards. 

Email: mari-lou.rowley@usask.ca 

Websites: www.usask.academia.edu/Mari-LouRowley and www.marilourowley.com

Joel Salt

Ph.D. program

Joel is ABD, specializing in 17th-century Literature. He is supervised by Dr. Brent Nelson. His dissertation will examine liminality in the prose and poetry of John Donne.

Email: joel.salt@usask.ca

Sheheryar B. Sheikh

Ph.D. program

Sheheryar’s work, under supervision of Dr. Lindsey Banco, examines the presence of Quranic revelatory apocalypticism in post-9/11 American novels. Sheheryar’s previous degrees include an MFA in Creative Writing from Notre Dame, where he won a Nicholas Sparks Scholarship and Steve Tomasula’s La Vie de Bohème Award. His first novel, The Still Point of the Turning World (HarperCollins India, 2017) was longlisted for the Getz Pharma Prize, and his second novel, Call Me Al: The Hero’s Ha-Ha Journey (HarperCollins India, 2019) has just recently been published to acclaim.

Megan Solberg

Ph.D. program

Megan is a third year PhD student who holds a B.A. (Honours) in English from the University of Saskatchewan and an M.A. in Literature from the University of Westminster (U.K.). Supervised by Dr. Ann Martin, her research examines the intersection of creative practice, marginalization, and suffering in the works of Katherine Mansfield, Dorothy L. Sayers, and Jean Rhys. 

Email: megan.solberg@usask.ca

Tristan B. Taylor

Ph.D. program

B.A. English (Calgary), M.A. Medieval and Early Modern Studies (Kent) 

Tristan examines evidence of generic convention and rhetoric in late-medieval hagiographic texts. His current work is on the Life of Thomas Becket as it appears in the South English Legendary. His areas of interest are: codicology, medieval reading practices, saints’ literature, devotional and mystical literature, and digital humanities. He is a Research Assistant for Dr. Yin Liu’s Medieval Codes project. 

Supervisor: Dr. Yin Liu 

Website: tristanbtaylor.ca

Email: tristan.taylor@usask.ca

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Heather Torvi

MA program

Heather is a first-year Master’s thesis student who is working in 18 th Century literature. Currently she is a Research Assistant for the Grub Street Project under her supervisor Dr. Allison Muri. When she is not working she enjoys spending time working on her memory books.

Adam A. Vazquez

Ph.D. program

Before Adam's Canadian adventure, he received his undergraduate and M.A. degrees at the UNAM in Mexico. He is interested in medieval literature and Digital Humanities.

Rodrigo Pablo Yanez

Ph.D. program

Rodrigo’s research interests include Restoration/Eighteenth Century Literature, Spatial Theory and Literary Cartography/Geography, Digital Humanities, and Game Studies. He has published papers on Ivanhoe and its remediations, and on the function of diegetic music in the video game Bioshock. Rodrigo’s PhD dissertation uses digital mapping to examine how a self is constructed in relation to space in James Boswell’s London Journal 1762-63.