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Dr. Gord McCalla (PhD) is among the world’s top researchers in the areas of artificial intelligence in education and user modelling and personalization. (Photo: submitted)

USask computer scientist wins lifetime achievement award

Dr. Gord McCalla (PhD), professor emeritus in the Department of Computer Science, has won a 2021 Lifetime Achievement Award from CS-Can|Info-Can

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University of Saskatchewan (USask) professor emeritus Dr. Gord McCalla (PhD) has been honoured by Canada’s national computer science research society.

McCalla is a 2021 recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award from Computer Science Canada | Informatique Canada (CS-Can|Info-Can). The award recognizes current and former faculty members at Canadian computer science departments who have made outstanding and sustained contributions to computing over their careers.

McCalla is among the founders and the world’s top researchers in the areas of artificial intelligence in education and user modelling and personalization. The recipient of the 2010 Distinguished Graduate Supervisor Award from USask, he has had a profound impact as a mentor and teacher to generations of students.

McCalla spent four decades as part of USask’s Department of Computer Science and continues his leadership in his field since his retirement. He recently co-edited a special issue of the International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education dedicated to the late USask computer science faculty member Dr. Jim Greer (PhD).

Read the full citation for McCalla on the CS-Can|Info-Can website.


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