Picture of Glenn Stuart

Glenn Stuart Ph.D., Arizona State University Environmental Archaeologist and Assistant Professor

Office
Archaeology 207

Research Area(s)

  • Environmental Archaeology
  • Archaeobotany, paleoethnobotany and paleoenvironmental reconstruction
  • Archaeology of Western Canada
  • Human Environmental Impact
  • Subsistence strategies

Publications

Selected Recent Publications:

Stuart, Glenn S.L. and Walker, E.G. 2018. Pollen and charcoal studies at the Wolf Willow site, Wanuskewin Heritage Park, Saskatoon, Canada. Vegetation History and Archaeobotany 27(3):507-525.

Stuart, Glenn S.L. 2018. Paleoethnobotany (revised). In Smith C. (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology online, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-51726-1_2412-2, (16 pp.). New York, NY: Springer.

Wells, E. C., K. L. Davis-Salazar, J. E. Moreno-Cortés, G. S. L. Stuart and A. C. Novotny. 2014. Analysis of the context and contents of an Ulua-style marble vase from the Palmarejo Valley, Honduras. Latin American Antiquity 25(1):82-100.

Stuart, Glenn S. L. 2014. Paleoethnobotany. In Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology, edited by C. Smith, pp. 5755-5760. Springer New York. 

Stuart, Glenn S.L., 2012. Paleoethnobotany at AZ U:15:1(REC) and AZ U:15:8(REC). Cultural Resources Report prepared for the San Carlos Irrigation and Drainage District (SCIDD), Coolidge, AZ by Archaeological Consulting Services, Ltd., Tempe, AZ.

Stuart, Glenn S.L., 2012. Paleoethnobotany of the AZ TO:SX:4(TON) Canal. Cultural Resources Report prepared for Bureau of Indian Affairs, Phoenix, AZ by Archaeological Consulting Services, Ltd., Tempe, AZ.

Stuart, Glenn S.L., 2011. Paleoethnobotany of Compound A, Casa Grande Site. Cultural Resources Report prepared for the Gila River Indian Community – Cultural Resource Management Program (GRIC-CRMP), Sacaton, AZ by Archaeological Consulting Services, Ltd., Tempe, AZ.

Stuart, Glenn S.L., 2011. Pollen Analysis of the Yamashita Sites, Clark County, Nevada, Parts I and II. Cultural Resources Report prepared for Dr. M. Lyneis, by Archaeological Consulting Services, Ltd., Tempe, AZ.

Stuart, Glenn S.L., 2011. Paleoethnobotany of the SCIP Headquarters Canal Features 1.01, 1.02, and 2, AZ U:14:115(ASM), The Horvath Site. Cultural Resources Report prepared for GRIC-CRMP, Sacaton, AZ by Archaeological Consulting Services, Ltd., Tempe, AZ.

Stuart, Glenn S.L., 2011. Pollen Analysis of AZ J-33-35(NN), near Cow Springs, Coconino County and Navajo Nation, Arizona. Cultural Resources Report prepared for HDR Engineering, Phoenix, AZ by Archaeological Consulting Services, Ltd.

Stuart, Glenn S.L., 2011. Macrobotanical Analysis of AZ J-33-35(NN), near Cow Springs, Coconino County and Navajo Nation, Arizona. Cultural Resources Report prepared for HDR Engineering, Phoenix, AZ by Archaeological Consulting Services, Ltd.

Stuart, Glenn S.L., 2011. Paleoethnobotany of a Paleoindian through Basketmaker II site in Southwest Utah. Cultural Resources Report prepared for Bighorn Archaeological Consultants, Santa Clara, Utah, by Archaeological Consulting Services, Ltd.

Stuart, Glenn S.L., 2011. Paleoethnobotany at 42WS476, Southwest Utah. Cultural Resources Report prepared for Bighorn Archaeological Consultants, Santa Clara, Utah, by Archaeological Consulting Services, Ltd

Stuart, Glenn S.L. 2011. Tracks Through Time: The Archaeology of the Valley Metro Light Rail Corridor. Archaeological Consulting Services, Ltd., Tempe, AZ and Valley Metro, Phoenix, AZ.  

Stuart, Glenn S.L., 2011 Syntheses and Interpretations, In Tracks Through Time: Urban Archaeology Along the Valley Metro Light Rail Corridor, Volume IV, Part II. Edited by Allan J. Schilz, Margerie Green, Lourdes Aguila, and Glennda Gene Luhnow. Archaeological Consulting Services, Ltd., Tempe, AZ.

Stuart, Glenn S.L. and Q. Stefaniak, 2011. Paleoethnobotany. In Tracks through Time: Urban Archaeology along the Valley Metro Light Rail Corridor, Volume IV, Part II: Paleoethnobiological Analyses and Archaeological Synthesis, edited by Allan J. Schilz, Margerie Green, Lourdes Aguila, and Glennda Gene Luhnow. Archaeological Consulting Services, Ltd., Tempe, AZ.

Stuart, Glenn S.L. and L. Aguila, 2010. Prehistoric Settlement and Land Use Along the Lower Agua Fria River. Report prepared for AZTEC Engineering, Phoenix, Arizona by Archaeological Consulting Services, Ltd., Tempe, AZ.

Stuart, Glenn S.L., 2010. Paleoethnobotany at 42KA6165, Kane County, Utah. Report prepared for HRA, Inc. Conservation Archaeology, Las Vegas, Nevada by Archaeological Consulting Services, Ltd. Tempe, Arizona.


Teaching & Supervision

Current U of S Courses:

Arch 112.3 The Human Journey: Introduction to Archaeology and Biological Anthropology

 This course provides a biological and cultural overview of the human journey, beginning with human evolutionary origins and proceeding to the emergence of complex urban societies. Topics covered will include: early hominins and the development of anatomically modern humans; the evidence for early hominin cultural development; the appearance of anatomically modern humans and their earliest cultural accomplishments; the transition from mobile hunter-gatherer lifeways to sedentary agricultural societies; and the development of increasing social complexity, culminating in the emergence of urban states. Discussion of these topics will begin with an introduction to archaeology, followed by a discussion of Africa’s paleoanthropological record, the geographical expansion and cultural diversification of humans across the world, the advent of agriculture, and the rise of complex (urban) society.

Arch 250.3 Introduction to Archaeological Science

Analysis is the foundation upon which archaeological inference rests. Consequently, an understanding of archaeological analysis is crucial to both conducting and comprehending archaeological research. This course offers a study of the theory, methods and techniques used by archaeologists in survey, excavation, analysis and interpretation; particular emphasis is placed on methods and techniques. In addition, the laboratory component of the class presents students with the opportunity to analyze various classes of artifacts and learn how to handle archaeological material and data.

 Arch 330.3 The Archaeology of Human Environmental Impact

This course illustrates how humans have been an integral and active component of earth’s ecology for many thousands of years. This long history of interaction between humans and their environments has had both deleterious and positive impacts, for us and other species. By studying the dynamic ecological role of human society and how humans impacted their environments in the past, we gain a better appreciation of the potential effects of our own activities and their environmental consequences. Many of the processes affecting the planet today are deeply rooted in our past, as many of the actions we see today – deforestation and land clearing, over-grazing, erosion, soil salinization and loss of fertility, for example – were produced by and had impacts upon past societies. Similarly, past societies were forced to deal with the effects of climate change, a problem with which our current society is struggling. A better understanding of how these situations arose in the past, and the environmental, political, and social consequences that they had, may help us to better discern general principles that continue to operate today, and thus plan toward our future.

 Arch 350.3 Introduction to Boreal Forest Archaeology

This course concerns the archaeology of the boreal forest region, stretching from inland Alsaska and southern Yukon to Newfoundland and Labrador, with particular reference to northern Saskatchewan and Alberta and occasional reference to the boreal forest regions of Eurasia. The course presents a review of the environment of this region and the relationships of human populations to this environment over the past 15,000 years or more. The archaeological cultures of the different parts of this region are reviewed in detail, as are methodological and theoretical approaches to the archaeology of the area.

Arch 360.3 Archaeological Resource Management

This course provides a theoretical and methodological introduction to the management and conservation of archaeological sites and materials. We will examine the various facets of cultural resource management on international, national and provincial levels with detailed examination of the regulations, procedures, realities and weaknesses of what is essentially applied archaeology in western Canada.  Important developments within CRM including increasing involvement of First Nations and Engagement; concerns regarding sacred objects, sites and landscapes; human remains; professional ethics; conservation of sites and curation of collections and other topics will be addressed.

Arch 361.6 Archaeological Field Methods

Six weeks of field experience in archaeological research techniques including site survey, excavation, and laboratory analysis. The field location will depend on areas of departmental projects, though for the last several years has been held at Wanuskewin Heritage Park. Offered only in Spring and Summer Session.

Arch 861.3 Graduate Seminar in Boreal Forest Archaeology

This course will provide students with an advanced understanding of boreal forest archaeology in Canada, focusing on northern Saskatchewan and Alberta, as well as adjacent and/or relevant parts of British Columbia, Alaska, the Yukon, the Northwest Territories, Nunavut, and Manitoba. Readings will incorporate academic publications on these regions, but will also draw, as possible, from the extensive body of unpublished cultural resource management reports that have been generated as part of the ongoing industrial developments in northern Canada. This combination of resources will provide an up-to-date picture of current knowledge regarding these regions’ archaeology, with a particular focus on problems and progress in the creation of accurate and reliable culture histories. Discussion will focus on analyzing and synthesizing these bodies of literature in order to thoroughly examine the methodological and theoretical issues that have hampered the development of archaeological investigation in this region of the boreal forest.

Arch 862.3 Graduate Seminar in Environmental Archaeology

This course will provide students with an advanced understanding of environmental archaeology, with particular emphasis on the relationship between people and the environments within which they live. Though the course will focus on the Northern Plains and/or Boreal Forest of Saskatchewan and surrounding areas, it will include examples derived from further afield, as required to provide a fuller understanding of the subject matter, and to serve the needs of the students enrolled. Readings will predominately derive from widely available academic publications, but may also incorporate material from unpublished or narrowly circulated cultural resource management reports (“grey” literature). This combination of resources will provide an up-to-date picture of current knowledge regarding the use and application of environmental archaeology. In particular, the course will focus on problems and progress in the creation of palaeoenvironmental data at a scale and scope suitable for archaeological investigation. Discussion will focus on thoroughly examining the methodological and theoretical issues that have hampered the development of palaeoenvironmental sequences at a scale and scope necessary to inform archaeological data on the Northern Plains and/or Boreal Forest.

Research

Archaeobotony Archaeology of Western Canada (Plains focus) Environmental Archaeology Human Impact and Sustainability

Dr. Stuart is an environmental archaeologist who studies the interaction between people and their environments through analysis of artifacts and botanical remains. Currently, he and his students are conducting paleoenvironmental and paleoethnobotanical research through pollen, phytolith, and macrobotanical analysis at Wanuskewin Heritage Park, located roughly 2.5 km north of the city of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, as well as other areas on the Northern Plains. He and his students are conducting similar research through a community-based project on the Northwest Coast of British Columbia, where they are also incorporating ancient DNA analysis to get a better understanding of the relationships between people and plants. He and his students are also actively involved in community based research in the boreal forest of Saskatchewan and Alberta. 

Dr. Stuart has over 30 years of experience in archaeology and paleoethnobotany.  His main research interests are paleoethnobotany, subsistence strategies, traditional and prehistoric plant–people interactions, the archaeology of hunter-gatherers and middle-range societies, landscape archaeology, paleoenvironmental reconstruction, and human environmental impacts; and to conduct such research through community-based projects. His analytical specialties are pollen and macrobotanical analysis including the application of quantitative and GIS methods to their interpretation.

He has directed archaeological excavations at numerous sites, ranging from hunter-gatherer camp and kill sites in Canada’s Boreal Forest and Parkland; to tipi ring, kill, and vision quest sites on the Plains; pit house villages and canals in the American Southwest; and agricultural fields in Mesoamerica. He has also led cultural resource reconnaissance surveys throughout the Arctic, Boreal Forest, Parklands, Mountains, and Plains of northern and western Canada as well as the Deserts and Mountains of the American Southwest; and collected lacustrine pollen cores and conducted paleoenvironmental reconstruction projects in the Boreal Cordillera of the southwest Yukon and the Southern Interior Mountains of southeast British Columbia.

Geographically, Dr. Stuart has conducted research in Canada, the United States, various parts of Latin America, and England. Within Canada, his research has included the Yukon, Northwest Territories, Nunavut, British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. His research in the U.S. includes working on sites in Oregon, Wyoming, California, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, Ohio, and South Carolina. Within Latin America, he has directed or assisted on projects in Jalisco, Zacatecas, and the site of Teotihuacan in Mexico; as well as in Belize and Honduras.

Education & Training

 

B.A., University of Calgary, 1981, Department of Archaeology

M.A., University of Calgary, 1986, Department of Archaeology (Thesis title: An Archaeological and Paleoenvironmental Correlation for the Kluane - Aishihik Area, Southwest Yukon, Canada)

Ph.D., Arizona State University, 2003, Department of Anthropology (Archaeology) (Dissertation title: Pre-Hispanic Sociopolitical Development and Wetland Agriculture in the Tequila Valleys of West Mexico)