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MFA in Writing Grad Meaghan Hackinen Sets World Cycling Record and Launches Cycling Memoir

Posted on 2019-11-07 in News, MFA in Writing News

MFA in Writing Graduate Meaghan Hackinen

Meaghan Hackinen, MFA in Writing Graduate, has just set a world cycling record, cycling 460.8 miles in 24 hours at the World Time Trial Championships. For more details about Hackinen’s cycling record, check out the Star-Phoenix news story and the Castanet news story.

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Hackinen will be in Saskatoon at McNally Robinson on November 21 to launch her new book, South Away: The Pacific Coast on Two Wheels. Candace Savage calls Hackinen’s book an “exhilarating debut,” while Booklist describes it as an “empowering memoir.” 

 

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