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Literature Matters

Posted in Arts & Culture, Research, Scholarly & Artistic Work
Sep 18, 2019

Members of the Department of English examine diverse literary topics in the Literature Matters community lecture series.

Members of the Department of English examine diverse literary topics in this community lecture series featuring refreshments and discussion.

Joseph Conrad’s Russia in Under Western Eyes by Ludmilla Voitkovska

Date: Sept. 18, 2019
Time: 7:30 pm
Location: Grace-Westminster United Church Social Hall, 505 10th St. E.
Cost: Free
Info: (306) 966-1268 | english.department@usask.ca 


 


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