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The Writing on the Wall: The Work of Joane Cardinal-Schubert

Posted in Arts & Culture
Feb 1, 2019 to Apr 27, 2019

Joane Cardinal-Schubert, Rider (detail), 1986, 60” x 84”, oil and graphite on canvas, collection of the estate of the artist. Photo by Dave Brown / University of Calgary.

Curated by Lindsey V. Sharman

Feb. 1 - April 27, 2019

Free

Opening reception: Friday, Feb. 1 | 4 pm

College Art Galleries, University of Saskatchewan

Circulated by Nickle Galleries, this touring exhibition shows the cyclical nature of the work of Joane Cardinal-Schubert (1942-2009). It includes pivotal pieces in painting, drawing, printmaking, collage, ceramic and installation.

 

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