News & Events

 


Literature Matters: Through an Indigenous Woman’s Lens: Revitalizing Our Relationship with the Water Using Movement, Song and Story

Posted in Arts & Culture, Indigenous
Jan 23, 2019

Reading, studying and talking about literary works helps us make sense of the world around us.

Reading, studying and talking about literary works helps us make sense of the world around us. In this series of community talks, members of the Department of English explore diverse literary topics.

Wednesday, Jan. 23
7:30 pm
Grace-Westminster United Church Social Hall
505 10th St. E.

Free and Open to the public.
Info: (306) 966-1268 | english.department@usask.ca

Through an Indigenous Woman’s Lens: Revitalizing Our Relationship with the Water Using Movement, Song and Story
by Tasha Beeds (Department of English)

 

Back to News Listing

Related Articles

Creative Isolation: Jazz musician Dean McNeill rallies for the arts

Posted on 2020-05-28

Professor Dean McNeill will become head of the Department of Music in July


USask unites: Campus jazz musicians release tribute to health-care workers during COVID-19

Posted on 2020-05-27

The USask Jazz Combo put together a video featuring members recording themselves playing in isolation


Angela Jaime appointed vice-dean Indigenous in the College of Arts and Science

Posted on 2020-05-27

A member of the Pit River and Valley Maidu Tribes of Northern California, Jaime comes to USask from the University of Wyoming


Documentary about Colten Boushie's death wins Canadian Screen Award

Posted on 2020-05-26

Filmmaker Dr. Tasha Hubbard Hubbard (BA’94, MA’06) is a graduate of USask’s College of Arts and Science and a former faculty member in the college’s Department of English


Saskatchewan Métis scholar hired as Gabriel Dumont Research Chair in Métis Studies at USask

Posted on 2020-05-25

Dr. Allyson Stevenson (PhD) will work to build research and teaching capacity in Métis studies at USask


From overseas to music degree for soprano

Posted on 2020-05-08

Five years ago, Angela Gjurichanin made a life-changing move from Macedonia to Canada with her family, without a firm grasp of English and without truly knowing what to expect