News & Events

 


Philosophy in the Community: Why Legal Aid Matters for Justice

Posted in Arts & Culture, Politics & Society
Mar 8, 2019

Philosophy in the Community is held on Friday nights at The Refinery.

This community lecture and discussion series is organized by the Department of Philosophy to share the rewards and pleasures of philosophical reflection.

Friday, March 8
7–9 pm
The Refinery, Emmanuel Anglican Church Basement
609 Dufferin Ave.

Free and open to the public

Why Legal Aid Matters by Sarah Buhler, College of Law

In this talk, I discuss the vital importance of publicly funded legal aid in the context of a justice system and legal regime that disproportionately impact members of marginalized communities. The talk will include some history and background about legal aid programs in Canada and will argue that legal aid can both mitigate harm, and promote justice, for people who find themselves drawn into the system.

Info: emer.ohagan@usask.ca

 

Back to News Listing

Related Articles

The Conversation: Canada: Is it really a country divided?

Posted on 2019-06-18

Canada has had some success protecting cultural and linguistic diversity, says a new article co-authored by a USask political studies professor


USask art professor’s work featured in two solo shows in Greece

Posted on 2019-06-17

With Passages, Allyson Glenn delves into the past to ask what the ancient gods would do in modern times


Gordon Snelgrove Gallery: Our Trees

2019-06-17
Posted on 2019-06-14

The gifts and enchantments of trees are explored through the thoughts of writers and the eyes of visual artists


‘Nature needs space’: New USask report makes recommendations to protect Saskatoon’s Swales

Posted on 2019-06-11

Warrick Baijius, a PhD candidate in the Department of Geography and Planning, wrote the report Comprehending Swale Ecosystems: Research Synthesis and Analysis


Political studies professor wins national teaching award

Posted on 2019-06-06

Dr. Loleen Berdahl (PhD) is the recipient of the 2019 Prize for Teaching Excellence from the Canadian Political Science Association


National Post: Computers are learning to read our feelings from our faces. Soon, we may not be able to hide our worst thoughts

Posted on 2019-06-06

Technological advances imperil the emotional privacy that allows us to keep our thoughts and feelings to ourselves, warns USask philosopher William Buschert