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Professor M. James (Jim) Hendry of the Department of Geological Sciences (right) and Professor John Tse of the Department of Physics and Engineering Physics have been named distinguished professors of the University of Saskatchewan.

Lifetime honours for researchers

Two College of Arts and Science professors named distinguished professors of the University of Saskatchewan

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Two internationally renowned researchers in the College of Arts and Science have been named distinguished professors of the University of Saskatchewan.

Professor M. James (Jim) Hendry of the Department of Geological Sciences and Professor John Tse of the Department of Physics and Engineering Physics received the honorary title on July 1. The award celebrates exceptional lifetime achievements in research, scholarly or artistic work by U of S faculty members.


Jim Hendry

A global leader in the areas of hydrogeology and geochemistry, Jim Hendry’s research focuses on the impact of mining on the environment. He has made critical contributions to solutions for addressing the contamination of water at mine sites, and his work has dramatically improved scientists’ understanding of the movement of water and contaminants through the ground. Hendry’s research over the past three decades has laid the foundation for potential nuclear waste disposal options and methods for sequestering carbon dioxide underground.

Hendry holds the Endowed Cameco Research Chair in Aqueous and Environmental Geochemistry and he held an NSERC-Industrial Senior Research Chair from 1996 until 2017. His previous honours and awards include the John Hem Excellence Award in Science and Engineering; an NSERC Synergy Award; an earned Doctor of Science degree from the U of S; and the Henry Darcy Distinguished Lectureship. He is a fellow of both the Geological Association of Canada and the Geological Society of America.


John Tse

John Tse uses state-of-the-art experimental and theoretical techniques to explore the nature of matter. He has earned an international reputation in materials science, a field of research that seeks to develop novel materials with useful properties. Through his work at the Canadian Light Source synchrotron and his pioneering supercomputer simulations, he has grown our understanding of the principles underlying material physics and sparked several paradigm shifts in his field. Tse’s research has opened pathways to important advances in energy storage, electronics, superconductors and more.

Tse has held the Canada Research Chair in Materials Science and has been the recipient of many other honours, including a U of S Distinguished Research Award, an earned Doctor of Science from the U of S and honorary professorships at numerous international universities. He has been named a senior fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science and a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.


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