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Indigenous Science: Weaving Ways of Knowing

Posted in Science & Technology, Indigenous
Mar 5, 2018

Michelle Hogue

A public lecture and conversation with Michelle Hogue

Monday, March 5
3:00–4:00 pm
Gordon Oakes Red Bear Student Centre

As a person of Métis heritage, Michelle Hogue is passionate about enabling Indigenous academic success through early engagement and retention in ways that bridge cultures and attend to Indigenous ways of knowing and learning. Currently an associate professor and the coordinator of the First Nations’ Transition Program at the University of Lethbridge, Michelle sees first-hand the challenges Indigenous students experience in transitioning to and through post-secondary education. She is dedicated to enabling Indigenous success in STEM through the inclusion of Indigenous culture and the arts. Her work explores best practices in Canada, Australia and New Zealand to develop an inclusive, culturally responsive teaching practice and curricula through the philosophy of Bridging Cultures: Two-Eyed Seeing for Both Ways Knowing to enable Indigenous academic success.

For more information, contact sandy.bonny@usask.ca

Sponsored by the College of Arts & Science Role Model Speaker Fund and the Aboriginal Student Achievement Program

 

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