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U of S Canada 150 Book Launch Series: The Mighty Hughes

Posted in Politics & Society, Alumni, Indigenous
Oct 12, 2017

The Mighty Hughes by Craig McInnes

The U of S Canada 150 Project will host three Indigenous-related book launches. The second is on Oct. 12:
The Mighty Hughes From Prairie Lawyer to Western Canada’s Moral Compass
by journalist Craig McInnes

When: Thursday, Oct. 12 at 4:00 pm

Where: College of Law Dentons LLP Student Lounge

Ted Hughes, one of the College of Arts & Science's first 100 Alumni of Influence, has made an outstanding contribution nationally as chief federal treaty negotiator, and is well known for his tireless work as chief adjudicator in residential school settlement claims. Hughes will be present along with author McInnes to talk about the book and sign copies.

For more information about these and other initiatives, please check https://canada150.usask.ca/

 

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