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Brent Nelson

Brent Nelson

B.R.E. (Briercrest), B.A., M.A. (Waterloo), Ph.D. (Toronto)

Associate Professor

Office: Arts 317
Phone: 966-1820
Email: brent.nelson@usask.ca
Website: http://www.usask.ca/digitalark/

Honours, Awards & Distinctions (Most Recent)

  • USSU Teaching Excellence Award (nominated), awarded by ENG321 Shakespeare Class, January 1, 2006
  • Doctoral Fellowship, awarded by Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, January 1, 1994 until January 1, 1998

Research

Brent Nelson is principal investigator of The Culture of Curiosity in England and Scotland 1580-1700 and is building a virtual museum of collections of curiosities in this context.  He is also the director of the John Donne Society's Digital Text Project and a co-lead of the Textual Studies team in INKE: Implementing New Knowledge Environments.  He is assocate  editor of Opuscula: Short Texts of the Middle Ages and Renaissance (OSTMAR) and of ArchBook: Architectures of the Book.

Publications (Most Recent)

  • Nelson, B. "Radiant Donne: The Case for the Electronic Text." John Donne Journal. (In Press)
  • Nelson, B, Ruecker, Stan, Radzikowska, Milena, Sinclair, Stu00e9fan, Brown, Susan, Bieber, Mark, & INKE team. "A Short History and Demonstration of the Dynamic Table of Contents." Scholarly Research Communication. (Accepted)
  • Nelson, B. "Old Ways for Linking Texts in the Digital Environmen." Digital Humanities Quarterly.
  • Nelson, B. "Beyond Remediation: The Role of Textual Studies in Implementing New Knowledge Environment." Scholarly and Research Communication.
  • Nelson, B, & Terras, Melissa. Digitizing Medieval and Early Modern Material Culture. Toronto: Iter & Tempe, AZ: Arizona Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2012.
  • Nelson, B. "Beyond Remediation: The Role of Textual Studies in Implementing New Knowledge Environments." In Digitizing Medieval and Early Modern Material Culture, edited by Terras, Melissa, 21-48. Toronto: Iter & Tempe, AZ: Arizona Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2012.
  • Nelson, B. "'pleasure for our sense, health for our hearts': Inferring Pronuntiatio and Actio from the Text of John Donne's Second Prebend Sermon." In Listening Up, Writing Down, and Looking Beyond: Interfaces of the Oral, Written and Visual, edited by Gingell, Susan & Roy, Wendy. Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid Laurier UP, 2012.
  • Nelson, B. "Cain-Leviathan Typology in Gollum and Grendel." Extrapolation 49 (2009): 466-485.
  • Nelson, B. "Bridging Communities in Digital Scholarship." Digital Studies / Le champ numérique 1.3 (2009).
  • Nelson, B, Barbour, Reid & Preston, Claire. "Sir Thomas Browne, Edward Brown, and the Culture of Curiosity." In TheWorld Proposed: Essays on Sir Thomas Browne, edited by , 80-99. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008.
  • Nelson, B. "Curious Readers and Meditative Form in Thomas Browne's Hydriotaphia." In 'A man very well studyed': Thomas Browne in Context, edited by Todd, Richard & Murphy, Kathryn, 107-126. Leiden: E.J. Brill, 2008.
  • Nelson, B. "Reassembling the Disassembled Book." Computing in the Humanities Working Papers A (2008): 41-46.