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Daughters of the vote

Posted on 2017-03-13 in Politics & Society, Students & Campus Life

Deena Kapacila, political studies student, in the House of Commons on March 8. (Submitted photo)

By Lyndall Mack

If you were to step onto Parliament Hill on March 8, you might have been surprised to find the seats of the House of Commons occupied by young women from all across Canada. The delegates, including students of the College of Arts & Science, represented each federal riding.

In celebration of International Women’s Day, they were participants in Daughters of the Vote, an initiative dedicated to inspiring women’s involvement in Canadian politics.

The delegates from Saskatchewan included College of Arts & Science history student Mariah Hillis; English/political studies student Emily Klatt; and political studies students Deena Kapacila, Kirsten Samson, Kristen Seipp and Brooke Malinoski.

The overriding aim was to inspire women to be equal participants in our national political decisions.

Lyndall Mack is a student intern in the College of Arts & Science communications & events office.

 

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