News & Events

 

Daughters of the vote

Posted on 2017-03-13 in Politics & Society, Students & Campus Life

Deena Kapacila, political studies student, in the House of Commons on March 8. (Submitted photo)

By Lyndall Mack

If you were to step onto Parliament Hill on March 8, you might have been surprised to find the seats of the House of Commons occupied by young women from all across Canada. The delegates, including students of the College of Arts & Science, represented each federal riding.

In celebration of International Women’s Day, they were participants in Daughters of the Vote, an initiative dedicated to inspiring women’s involvement in Canadian politics.

The delegates from Saskatchewan included College of Arts & Science history student Mariah Hillis; English/political studies student Emily Klatt; and political studies students Deena Kapacila, Kirsten Samson, Kristen Seipp and Brooke Malinoski.

The overriding aim was to inspire women to be equal participants in our national political decisions.

Lyndall Mack is a student intern in the College of Arts & Science communications & events office.

 

Back to News Listing

Related Articles

Commitment to safety

Posted on 2017-06-23

The college's director of facilities is recognized for leadership in workplace safety


CTV News: Ancient artifact found at Wanuskewin

Posted on 2017-06-23

Two archeology students find a 4,200-year-old stone tool on their first-ever dig


New technique looks at lead in old bones

Posted on 2017-06-23

A geological sciences PhD graduate is helping synchrotron researchers reveal the “unseen worlds” within their samples


Summer of social justice in India

Posted on 2017-06-15

Delegates from the college lend their expertise at an intensive workshop for graduate students in India


App maps crop health

Posted on 2017-06-12

A new app from two computer science students will give farmers diagnostic details on their crops from a single photo


National Post: Should Tinder selfies come with an ‘object may have been manipulated’ warning?

Posted on 2017-06-12

Department of Psychology researchers examine tricks used on Tinder to shoot more appealing selfies