Our Graduate Programs

Introduction

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers three graduate-level degree programs:

  • MMath (project-based)
  • MSc (thesis-based)
  • PhD

For each of the three degree programs, students may select from one of four specializations:

  • Pure Mathematics 
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Discrete Mathematics
  • Statistics

Separate from our primary programs and specializations, our Department participates in the Collaborative Biostatistics Program, which is an interdisciplinary graduate program managed jointly by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, the Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, and the School of Public Health at the University of Saskatchewan.

In the thesis-based MSc and a PhD programs, students will conduct research on exciting problems and topics in the mathematical sciences under the guidance of at least one research supervisor.  For information on research groups and research interests of our faculty members, see the Research section of the Department web site.

In addition to thesis and project work, all three of our degree programs involve course work.  Our graduate courses involve a combination of taught, reading, and seminar courses designed to expose our students to both foundational and cutting-edge knowledge in mathematics and statistics, with the aim of preparing our students for research and for careers that draw upon mathematical thinking and problem solving.  To see the list of graduate courses on offer this year, as well as the course work requirements for each of the MMath, MSc, and PhD programs, please see our Information for Current Students.

For information on how to apply, please see our Application Procedures page.

Comparing Our Programs

This non-thesis program has a minimum course work requirement of 24 credit units (equivalent to 8 one-term courses). This program is intended for those interested in acquiring diverse, graduate-level knowledge in the mathematical sciences but without partaking in the original research required for a thesis. The MMath program is centred around a project whose outcome is an exposition or synthesis of existing and perhaps emerging ideas in the mathematical sciences. A student in this program will have a project supervisor(s) who will guide the student towards completing the thesis.

The minimum residency required for the MMath program is 12 months. Typically, a student will complete the program within two years.

For more information about the course work requirement and other policies associated with the program, please see Information for Current Students.



The course work requirement for an MSc candidate is a minimum of 15 credit units (equivalent to a minimum of 5 one-term courses). The research for the MSs thesis and the thesis preparation are supervised by designated research supervisor(s). The student is required to submit a thesis showing a competent understanding of an idea at the research frontier in the mathematical sciences and which contains a worthwhile contribution to knowledge around that idea. The candidate must pass an oral defence based on the work in the thesis.

The minimum residency required for the thesis-based MSc program is 12 months. In the majority of cases, students will take two years to complete the MSc program, although in some cases students may take slightly longer.

For more information about the course work requirement and other policies associated with the program, please see Information for Current Students.

The course work requirement in the PhD program is a minimum of 9 credit units (equivalent to a minimum of 3 one-term courses). The number of required courses will be determined by the student's Advisory Committee. 

A student registering in the PhD program must pass a written Qualifying Examination within the first 12 months of their program in order to demonstrate sufficient knowledge in one of four possible specializations.

After the student has completed all course requirements for the PhD, the student will be required to pass a Comprehensive Examination. which consists of a written report, an oral presentation, and an oral examination conducted by the candidate's Advisory Committee and is intended to ensure the student is prepared to begin work on a proposed area of research. 

The research for the PhD thesis and the thesis preparation are supervised by designated research supervisor(s). The student is required to submit a thesis containing a substantial and worthwhile contribution to current knowledge in a research specialization within the mathematical sciences. The adequacy of the thesis is decided by an Examination Committee consisting of the candidate's Advisory Committee and an External Examiner drawn from outside this University. The candidate must pass an oral defence based on the work in the thesis.

The minimum residency required for the PhD program is 24 months. In the majority of cases, students will take between four and five years to complete the PhD program.

For more information about the course work requirement, Qualifying and Comprehensive examination procedures, and other policies associated with the program, please see Information for Current Students.