Undergraduate Courses | 100 Level

Cree 101.6 Introductory Cree

Presents the elements of the grammar and vocabulary of Cree as spoken in central Canada and will introduce the oral literary tradition associated with it. Its objective will be to develop elementary competence in the language and a basic acquaintance with Cree culture and traditions.

Note: Students with credit for Cree 110 will not receive credit for this course.

Cree 110.3 nehiyawetan Let Us Speak Cree

Presents the elements of the grammar and vocabulary of Cree as spoken in central Canada and will introduce the oral literary tradition associated with it. Its objective will be to develop elementary competence in the language and a basic acquaintance with Cree culture and traditions. Students will work with the Cree Sound System and learn how to read and pronounce the Cree words given throughout. The course will cover: nouns, verbs, pronouns, asking questions and responding, conjugating verbs, time, numbers, and basic sentence structure. Students will be expected to familiarize themselves with Cree and/or Aboriginal Language and Culture resources within their community.

Note: Students with credit for Cree 101 will not receive credit for this course.

INDG 107.3 Introduction to Canadian Indigenous Studies

This course aims to develop critical reading, writing, and thinking skills and provide the background necessary for advanced Indigenous Studies courses. Through course lectures and seminar discussions this course presents an overview of Aboriginal societies across Saskatchewan and Canada by linking processes of the past with contemporary issues.

Formerly: NS 107

Undergraduate Courses | 200 Level

CREE 212.3 — Introduction to Cree Grammar and Literacy

This course introduces the grammar structure of the Plains Cree language through the use of a textbook and handouts. Cree 212 builds on the 100-level Cree class and provides a more linguistic and grammatical approach in learning the Plains Cree language. This is not an immersion course. A variety of individual and group activities involving oracy-based and literacy-based exercises will be consistently utilized in the classroom.

Prerequisite(s): Cree 101.6 or Cree 110.3

INDG 201.3 — Introduction to the Health and Well-being of Indigenous People

This course introduces students to the broad issues relating to Indigenous People’s Health & Well-Being in Canada and internationally through a decolonizing lens. It will cover foundational historical, political, social, economic, cultural and contemporary determinants of health. These will include, but are not limited to, issues relating to treaties and health, Indigenous health traditions of healing and care, Indigenous cultural values on health and well-being, traditional medicines, colonialism and decolonization, Indigenous health status, Indigenous health services, impacts of social determinants of health, mental health issues including intergenerational trauma, environment related issues of food, water security and climate change, and impacts of Indigenous social movements, international cooperation, UNDRIP and TRC, and emerging Indigenous health research. 

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level INDG and 3 credit units from ANTH, ARCH, ECON, GEOG, INDG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST.

INDG 210.3 — Indigenous Ways of Knowing

This course introduces students to the rich and complex natures, forms and diversities of Indigenous Knowledge in comparative and local contexts. The focus will be on the relevance of local/traditional/Indigenous knowledge to decolonization, environmental sustainability, and self-governance.

Formerly: NS 210

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level INDG and 3 credit units from ANTH, ARCH, ECON, GEOG, INDG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST.

INDG 212.3 Nehiyaw Tapsinowin Cree Cultural Histories

This is an introductory survey course of Cree cultural histories in North America with emphasis on Cree societies, experiences, resiliency strategies, and perspectives in present-day Saskatchewan. It will provide deeper insights into Cree history and life, knowledge translation, nihiyawéwin (Cree language, Cree speaking), the historical roots of contemporary issues, community engagement and research. Students will have the opportunity to work with Elders on research projects and gain experiential knowledge through participation in Cree social and cultural activities.

Formerly: NS 212

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level INDG and 3 credit units from ANTH, ARCH, ECON, GEOG, INDG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST.

INDG 214.3 Saulteaux Cultural Expressions

This course aims to develop a critical awareness of the regeneration of Saulteaux values as evidenced in ethnohistory, language, literature and oral tradition. Students will gain familiarity with linguistic features of the language, the history of Saulteaux First Nations in Saskatchewan, and commonalities with other regional contexts and dialects of Anishinaabe. Students will relate historical and cultural information to the contemporary context. Elder’s teachings will comprise a significant portion of course instruction. Format will be lectures, elder’s discourse, readings, guest speakers, film, research and reflective writing.

Formerly: NS 214

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level INDG and 3 credit units from ANTH, ARCH, ECON, GEOG, INDG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST.

Note: Students with credit for NS 298.3 Saulteaux Cultural Expressions may not receive credit for this course.

INDG 215.3 Metis Political and Poetic Writing

Through lectures, readings, seminar workshops and research, students will examine Métis writing for political and poetic themes such as identity, sovereignty, government relations, Indigenous rhetoric, identity, and worldview. The course will draw upon examples of historic and contemporary writing from speeches, essays, poetry, biography, novels, correspondence, songs, plays, and writing in public spaces.

Formerly: NS 215

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level INDG and 3 credit units from ANTH, ARCH, ECON, ENG, GEOG, INDG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST.

Note: Students with credit for NS 398 Métis Political and Poetic Writing may not receive credit for this course.

INDG 216.3 The Presence of the Past in Contemporary Indigenous Life

This course explores the presence of the past in contemporary Indigenous life in present-day Canada. Through lectures, readings, discussions, assignments, and guest-speakers, students will gain a deeper understanding of the sources and natures of selected current issues by interrogating them in their historical contexts.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level INDG and 3 credit units from ANTH, ARCH, ECON, GEOG, INDG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST.

Note: Students with credit for INDG 261 and/or INDG 262 may not receive credit for this course.

INDG 220.3 — Aboriginal Rights and the Courts

Will review the major court decisions rendered by the Supreme Court of Canada, U.S. Supreme Court, various provincial courts, and other tribunals that have shaped the scope of Aboriginal rights in Canada. In addition, the course will examine the role that Indigenous Studies scholars can plan in court proceedings.

Formerly: NS 220

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level INDG and 3 credit units from ANTH, ARCH, ECON, GEOG, INDG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST.

INDG 221.3 — Food Sovereignty

Course examines issues around Indigenous foods looking at contributions, impacts and threats within a local and global context. Historically many of the world’s foods originate and have been adapted by Indigenous peoples and were the basis for thriving local economies. Modern developments are having major social, cultural and health impacts on Indigenous communities. This course will examine some of those impacts and what Indigenous peoples and their allies are doing to restore and preserve local economies.

Formerly: NS 221

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level INDG and 3 credit units from ANTH, ARCH, ECON, GEOG, INDG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST.

INDG 230.3 — Gender in Traditional and Contemporary Indigenous Societies

This course focuses on a wide range of Indigenous gender issues and provides valuable information about past and current Indigenous male and female gender roles. Emphasis is placed on the historical context as a means of understanding the effects of colonialism, sexism, and racism on the lived experiences of Indigenous men and women. Current theories and methodologies of Indigenous feminism will be explored.

Formerly: NS 230

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level INDG and 3 credit units from ANTH, ARCH, ECON, GEOG, INDG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST.

INDG 241.3Weaving Indigenous Science and Western Science

What is science? Is Indigenous knowledge scientific knowledge? These and related questions are addressed in this course through an exploration of Indigenous and Western scientific ways of understanding nature and the universe. The course is designed to develop students' scientific literacy and cultural competence, providing a foundation for future learning and/or work with science and Indigenous peoples. Special attention will be paid to the ways that these knowledge systems situate humans in relation to the natural world. This class uses online learning; readings; classroom discussions; field experiences; and visits with Elders, scientists, and knowledge keepers to explore the tensions, complementarities, and combined possibilities of Indigenous and Western science.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level INDG and 3 credit units from ANTH, ARCH, ECON, GEOG, INDG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST.

Note: This intensive course utilizes online learning, classroom learning, and three full days of land-based experiential learning (one urban and two wilderness days). Students enrolling in this course will be responsible for providing their own transportation, food, and other equipment as required. Students with credit for NS 241 may not take this course for credit. This course was labeled NS 241 until 2015.

INDG 252.3 — Introduction to Indigenous Studies Research Methods

This course develops student understandings of research methodologies, concepts and practices in Indigenous Studies. It will introduce students to qualitative and quantitative research methods including Indigenous research methodologies, methods and techniques. It provides students with research knowledge, skills and tools for performing research in Indigenous communities.

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level INDG and 3 credit units from ANTH, ARCH, ECON, GEOG, INDG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST.

Note: Students with credit for INDG 350.6 may not take this course for credit.

INDG 255.3 — Cultural Survival of Aboriginal Family

This course studies the adaptation and persistence of family as the fundamental unit of social and political organization of Aboriginal society from the mid 19th century to the present. Topics to be considered are kinship, marriage, birth culture, child rearing, rites of passage, education, and interface with Canadian institutions and mainstream cultural expectations. Format is lectures, readings, seminars, guest speakers, film, and research.

Formerly: NS 255

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level INDG and 3 credit units from ANTH, ARCH, ECON, GEOG, INDG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST.

Note: Students with credit for NS 298 Cultural Survival of Aboriginal Family may not receive credit for this course.

INDG 256.3 — A Critical Survey of the History of Indigenous Child Welfare in Canada

This class examines the development and practice of Aboriginal Child Welfare in Canada from historic to contemporary times. Within a framework of examining the issue of Aboriginal control of child welfare as a right within the inherent right of self-government, major themes and concepts to be explored will include the “best interests of the child and Western liberal individual rights principles,” “rights of the First Nations child,” “over-representation” issues and challenges faced by First Nations controlled Family and Child Services. Additional areas of “child welfare” will also be examined. It will also consider critical/Indigenous perspective related to central themes, discourses and concepts within Aboriginal Child Welfare policy and practice. The course format includes lectures, readings, case studies, guest speakers, film and research.

Formerly: NS 256

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level INDG and 3 credit units from ANTH, ARCH, ECON, GEOG, INDG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST.

Note: Students with credit for NS 298 A Critical Survey of the History of Indigenous Child Welfare in Canada may not receive credit for this course.

INDG 261.3 — Aboriginal Intellectual and Cultural Traditions in Western Canada

Emphasis is on the First Nations and Metis peoples of Western Canada. Emphasis will be placed on the historical significance of worldviews as captured in their intellectual and cultural traditions. In order to explore these traditions, this course will focus on examining First Nations and Metis history in the late eighteenth century through to the mid-nineteenth century. Assignments will help the student develop tools of analysis essential to the development of research and writing skills.

Formerly: NS 261

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level INDG and 3 credit units from ANTH, ARCH, ECON, GEOG, INDG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST.

Note: Students with credit for NS 260 will not receive credit for this course.

INDG 262.3 — Aboriginal Narratives of Historical Memory

Emphasis will be on the narratives detailing the historical situations of First Nations and Metis peoples of Western Canada. This course is designed to demonstrate and analyze the development of these Aboriginal societies culturally, politically, economically and socially beginning in the late nineteenth century until the mid-twentieth century. Emphasis will be placed on the historical significance of Aboriginal societies in the development of Western Canada as well as their contemporary position.

Formerly: NS 262

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level INDG and 3 credit units from ANTH, ARCH, ECON, GEOG, INDG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST.

Note: Students with credit for NS 260 will not receive credit for this course.

INDG 264.3 — Aboriginal People and Canadian Politics

An analysis of contemporary Canadian political and administrative processes as they affect Indigenous Peoples. Emphasis will be placed on the Federal system of government and its effects on Native identity, community programs and local autonomy.

Formerly: NS 263, NS 264

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level INDG and 3 credit units from ANTH, ARCH, ECON, GEOG, INDG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST.

Note: Students with credit for NS 207 or NS 263 may not take INDG 264 for credit

INDG 265.3 — Aboriginal People and Development

Surveys the historic, political and economic causes of Aboriginal underdevelopment. Government-sponsored development projects will be examined and new strategies for Aboriginal economic development will be explored.

Formerly: NS 265, NS 365

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level INDG and 3 credit units from ANTH, ARCH, ECON, GEOG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST.

Note: Students with credit for NS 304 or NS 365 may not take INDG 265 for credit.

INDG 270.6 — Literature of Native North America

A survey of Native literature discussing the folklore, biography, drama, poetry and novels written about, and by Native Peoples. Emphasis will be placed on a multifaceted approach (aesthetic, linguistic, psychological, historical, and cultural) in examining Native Literature.

Formerly: NS 270

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level INDG and 3 credit units from ANTH, ARCH, ECON, ENG, GEOG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST.

INDG 272.3 — Native Americans USA

A history of American Indians from the contact period to the development of government policies. The Bureau of Indian Affairs and the American treaties, the removal of the Eastern tribes to the middle west, the termination policy, and contemporary issues will be discussed.

Formerly: NS 272, NS 372

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level INDG and 3 credit units from ANTH, ARCH, ECON, GEOG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST.

Note: Students with credit for NS 213 or NS 372 may not take INDG 265 for credit.

INDG 273.3 — North American Indigenous Gangs: A Comparison of Canada and the United States

This course will examine Canadian Aboriginal and American Indian gangs. Students will consider the historical and societal context within which Indigenous gangs are produced leading to an increased awareness and understanding of Indigenous youth participation in gangs. Some topics to be covered include: reservation/reserve and urban connections, the inter-generational impacts of the residential/boarding school, female gangs/gang members, institutionalized (criminal justice system) interactions, and the impact of prisons on the perpetuation of Indigenous gangs.

Formerly: NS 273

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level INDG and 3 credit units from ANTH, ARCH, ECON, GEOG, INDG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST.

INDG 280.6 — Metis History in Western Canada

Through lectures and seminar readings, the origin and development of the Metis is analyzed. Emphasizes the historical significance of the Metis in the development of Western Canada. Discusses contemporary issues of the Metis.

Formerly: NS 200, NS 280

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level INDG and 3 credit units from ANTH, ARCH, ECON, GEOG, INDG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST.

Note: Students with credit for NS 200 may not take INDG 280 for credit.

INDG 281.3 —First Nations History in Western Canada

This course traces the evolution of Western Canadian Indians from the earliest contact to the present era. Includes the tribes of the Pacific Coast, the Cordillera, the Western Subarctic and the Plains.

Formerly: NS 203, NS 281

Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units 100-level INDG and 3 credit units from ANTH, ARCH, ECON, GEOG, INDG, LING, NS, POLS, PSY, SOC, or WGST.

Note: Students with credit for NS 203 may not take INDG 281 for credit.

INDG 298.3 — Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

INDG 299.6 — Special Topics

Offered occassionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

Undergraduate Courses | 300 Level

INDG 302.6 — Seminar on Indian History

Through seminar presentations and readings, examines in depth major developments and themes in Canadian Indian history.

Formerly: NS 302

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units in Indigenous Studies

Note: Offered Spring and Summer Session for ITEP students only.

INDG 320.3 Transnational Indigenous Activism

This course provides an analysis of historical Indigenous activism and resistance in a transnational context. Emphasis will be placed on case studies of specific groups such as the American Indian Movement, as well as broad topics and theoretical concepts of resistance, militancy, radicalism, direct action, Red Power, and gender. Geographical focus will be on Indigenous North America, particularly Canada and the United States.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units in Indigenous Studies

INDG 321.3 International Indigenous Disaster Risk Reduction

This course examines traditional and contemporary approaches to disaster risk reduction (DRR) as practiced by Indigenous communities. Drawing on Indigenous philosophical traditions and adaptations in the face of colonization, topics examined will include: Indigenous interpretations of natural hazards, risk, vulnerability and resilience; the regulation of Indigenous planning and development; the role of Indigenous Knowledge in disaster response and recovery; the participation of Indigenous Peoples in provincial, federal and international disaster management; and the implementation of Indigenous DRR strategies in the 21st Century.

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units in Indigenous Studies

Note: Students with credit for INDG 398.3 International Indigenous Disaster Risk Reduction may not take this course for credit.

INDG 330.3 Critical Perspectives on Indigenous Sexualities and the Law

This course examines the relationship between indigeneity, sexuality, and the law in contemporary contexts in Indigenous and settler colonial legal orders. Drawing on Indigenous feminist and queer Indigenous legal studies, various topics will be examined, such as: Indigenous laws; the regulation of Indigenous sexuality in settler colonial nation building; marriage; monogamy, polygamy, polyamory; sterilization; sexual health and the law; sexual violence; HIV non-disclosure in sexual relationships; sex work and trafficking; and bodily self-determination and Indigenous articulations of sexuality.

Prerequisite(s): INDG 230 or Permission from the Instructor

INDG 331.3 Colonialism and Decolonization

This is a seminar course exploring the theoretical and practical manifestations of colonialism throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, particularly in settler-colonial societies like Canada. Specific emphasis will be given to decolonization as a program that dismantles colonial systems and expands Indigenous intellectual horizons.

Formerly: NS 331

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units in Indigenous Studies

Note: Students are recommended to complete INDG 264 prior to the beginning of this course

INDG 340.3 — Theory and Aboriginal Society

This course is designed to enhance student understandings of Aboriginal and Euro-North American intellectual traditions as they are applied to the interpretation of change within and between Aboriginal groups and societies. The primary focus is on the emergence of Aboriginal intellectual traditions within western institutions of health, law, science, education and politics specifically how they have come to challenge, influence and at times be rejected by entrenched Western constructions of Aboriginal groups and societies.

Formerly: NS 340

Prerequisite(s): INDG 216.3, plus 6 credit units of 200-level Indigenous Studies

INDG 341.3 — Indigenous Economic and Social Participation in the Fur Trade

This course offers Indigenous perspectives of economic, social, and cultural, aspects of the Aboriginal fur trade in Western Canada particularly in the subarctic geographical area. Through lectures, readings, films and assignments students will become familiar with various interpretations of the western Canadian fur trade and its role in Aboriginal economies, and cosmologies. Emphasis will be placed on the numerous ways the Indigenous Peoples participated in and shaped the fur trade to suit their needs. It will emphasize economic changes and adaptations made by participating Plains and Plateau Aboriginal groups. It will highlight the roles of women who through familial liaisons with European traders contributed their labour as wives, mothers, guides, interpreters, and provisioners. The impact of European disease will also be discussed.

Formerly: NS 398 - Fur Trade in Indigenous Societies

Prerequisite(s): INDG 216.3, plus 6 credit units of 200-level Indigenous Studies

INDG 351.3 Indigenous Oral Histories Research

This course explores the forms, qualities, diversities and cultural foundations of Indigenous oral narratives, and addresses practical aspects of gathering, recording, interpreting and utilizing them.

Formerly: NS 351

Prerequisite(s): INDG 252.3

INDG 352.3 Historical Research Methods in Indigenous Studies

This course builds on students' understandings of research methodologies, concepts, and practices in Indigenous Studies developed in INDG 252: Introduction to Indigenous Studies Research Methods. This course introduces students to practical elements of historical research methods and techniques in Indigenous Studies including oral interviews, microfilm, archival research, mapping, and museums and material culture.

Prerequisite(s): INDG 252.3

INDG 361.3 — Indigenous Community Development in the 21st Century

This course examines obstacles to and strategies for community development. Students will be encouraged to explore possible models that First Nations, Metis and other economically marginalized communities can employ. Beginning with a theoretical understanding of community economic development that will provide students with a sound grounding on how and why underdevelopment exists. This course will look at community development theories and practices that focus on local and sustainable principles as well as ones that reflect Indigenous values of holism and community well-being.

Prerequisite(s): INDG 265.3, plus 6 credit units of 200-level INDG courses

INDG 362.3 — Aboriginal People and Northern Development

Research seminar on northern development, including the socio-cultural and economic impacts of large-scale development projects, land claims and renewable resources, and other development issues as they affect northern Aboriginal Peoples.

Formerly: NS 462

Prerequisite(s): INDG 265.3, plus 6 credit units of 200-level Indigenous Studies

Note: Students with credit for NS 462 may not take INDG 362 for credit.

INDG 366.6 — Indigenous Peoples and Nation States

Issues of concern for Indigenous peoples globally are considered, and analogies to the Canadian Indigenous context made.

Formerly: NS 366.6

Prerequisite(s): INDG 216.3, and 6 credit units of 200-level NS or INDG

INDG 370.6 — Images of Indigenous North America

Examines how the various historical and contemporary images or representations emerged and changed over time and the cultural world views, ideas and values behind the images. Further discussion will centre around how these images affect our relationships with each other. After critical analysis of images, strategies for changing images will be explored. This will be done through interactive lectures, presentations, group and individual activities, critical viewing and analysis of photographs, films, videos, magazines, newspapers, and other popular media forms.

Formerly NS 208, NS 370

Prerequisite (s): INDG 216.3, plus 6 credit units of 200-level Indigenous Studies

Note: Students with credit for NS 208 may not take INDG 370 for credit.

INDG 371.3 — Indigenous Women

Building upon the foundation provided in INDG 230.3 Gender in Traditional and Contemporary Indigenous Societies, this seminar and lecture based course on Indigenous women provides an in-depth examination of the position of women in traditional pre-contact Indigenous societies and the changes to that position over time wrought by colonialism. This course also addresses contemporary issues of concern to Indigenous women and their communities and the various strategies being implemented to address them.

Prerequisite(s): INDG 230.3, plus 6 credit units of 200-level Indigenous Studies

INDG 373.3 Indigenous Masculinities in the Global Context

Though the literature on masculinity has increased dramatically in the last 15 years, researchers have only recently begun to explore the notion of Indigenous masculinities. The majority of research has emerged in the pacific islands and Africa, but has garnered sparse attention in North America. Through articles and books, lectures, class discussion, and written assignments, this course will introduce students to the issues of masculinity from global Indigenous perspectives and provide an introduction to the general masculinity literature. The course will explore to what degree the notions of masculinity in general, and global Indigenous masculinities specifically, applies to the North American context.

Formerly: NS 373

Prerequisite (s): INDG 230.3, plus 6 credit units of 200-level Indigenous Studies

INDG 398.3 — Special Topics

Offered occassionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

INDG 399.6 — Special Topics

Offered occassionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

Undergraduate Courses | 400 Level

INDG 410.3 - Aboriginal Self Determination through Mitho-Pimachesowin

This course examines a range of contemporary issues relating to the conceptual foundations of Aboriginal Self Determination. Historically, the Aboriginal "Way of Life" had spiritual roots and encompassed all of life, and this holistic perspective continues to influence modern developments in varying degrees. This class will introduce students to the Cree concept of Mitho Pimachesowin (ability to make a good living) and its application to contemporary initiatives in Aboriginal Self Determination. It will also explore its related elements of autonomy, kinship, work ethic, respect, responsibility and resilience.

Formerly: NS 410

Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units in Indigenous Studies or permission of the instructor

Note: Students with credit for NS 498 Aboriginal Self Determination through Mitho-Pimachesowin may not take INDG 410 for credit.

INDG 415.3 - Indigenous Genocide

That the literature on Indigenous genocide is relatively sparse reflects the degree in which non-Indigenous North Americans have constructed their national histories that either erases Indigenous historical presence as in the United States or as in Canada promotes a benevolent national character.  As a result, in both countries there is a refusal to take seriously any claims of Indigenous genocide.  This reading course will provide students the opportunity to explore the various ways in which genocide has been enacted upon Indigenous peoples, how discussions about Indigenous genocide has shifted in recent years, and the multitude of long-term implications genocide has created for Indigenous people.

Prerequisite(s): Two of INDG 210, INDG 216, INDG 261 or INDG 262, plus 12 credit units in Indigenous Studies.

Note: Students with credit for INDG 498 Indigenous Genocide may not take INDG 415 for credit.

INDG 430.3 — Issues in Cultural Preservation

This seminar course will take an interdisciplinary approach to explore issues of cultural preservation. The course will examine current cultural preservation initiatives, acquaint students with principles of cultural preservation and examine how these principles can be applied to different activities in a way that ensures Aboriginal cultural preservation.

Formerly: NS 430

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units in senior Indigenous Studies courses or permission of the instructor

INDG 440.3 — Theoretical Perspectives in Indigenous Studies

A research seminar which examines the concept of global Indigeneity, and the utility of this concept for understanding the Aboriginal contexts. Topics may include: underdevelopment, colonialism, internal colonialism, imperialism, and the metropolis-hinterland paradigm.

Formerly: NS 403, NS 440

Prerequisite(s): 12 credits units 300-level Indigenous Studies

Note: Students with credit for NS 403 may not take INDG 440 for credit.

INDG 450.6 — Research in Aboriginal Communities

Applied research on Saskatchewan Aboriginal Communities that utilizes both written and oral sources.

Formerly: NS 404, NS 450

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units 300-level Indigenous Studies

Note: Students with credit for NS 404 may not take INDG 450 for credit.

INDG 451.6 — Advanced Research Paper

The student will develop a research prospectus, undertake the research, and present a final report under the direction of a faculty advisor. Topics are open, subject to the availability of a faculty advisor. Topics are open, subject to the availability of a faculty advisor.

Formerly: NS 402, NS 451

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units 300-level Indigenous Studies

Note: Students with credit for NS 402 may not take INDG 451 for credit.

INDG 454.3 — Resistance and Resurgence in the International Indigenous World

The Department of Indigenous Studies, in collaboration with Swinburne University of Technology, the University of North Carolina at Pembroke, and the University of Hawaii, offer this field-based experiential learning course that rotates location yearly between Saskatchewan, Australia, North Carolina, and Hawaii.  Designed to bring together Indigenous Studies students from around the world, this course explores the many ways in which Indigenous peoples in the host country experience colonization and how their resistance has led to a contemporary Indigenous resurgence. Students from these institutions will learn from local Elders, knowledge keepers, and community members in a variety of field-based learning activities.

Formerly: INDG 498 

Prerequisite(s): 12 credit units in Indigenous Studies courses

Note: Students may take this course more than once for credit, provided the topics covered in each offering differ substantially. In such cases, students must consult the Department to ensure that the topics covered are different. Costs in addition to tuition may apply to this course. 

INDG 471.3 — Indigenous Women: Feminism, Politics, and Resistance

This course explores issues relating to the historical and contemporary experiences of Indigenous women in northern North America. It examines themes including Indigenous understandings of gender and kinship; the history of settler colonial policy and the regulation of Indigenous women; the law and criminalization; labour and informal economies; politics and activism; and motherhood and child welfare. This course also considers Indigenous feminist analyses and its relationship to understanding Indigenous women's issues.

Prerequisite(s): INDG 230 and 9 credit units INDG courses at the 300 level; or permission of the instructor

INDG 498.3 —Special Topics

Offered occassionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

INDG 499.6 — Special Topics

Offered occassionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.