Please note:

  • 6 cu 100-level English is a prerequisite for 200-level English classes and is the maximum to be taken for credit
  • 3 cu at the 200 level is a pre- or co-requisite for most 300-level English classes (exceptions: ENG 301, 310, and 366)
  • Students interested in Honours English are encouraged to take at least one Foundations class in second year.
  • This information is accurate as of March 31, 2019. Please note the University of Saskatchewan reserves the right to cancel or reschedule any classes. For the most up-to-date information, please click here.

Foundation Classes

ENG 203.6 (01) CRITICAL APPROACHES TO READING ENGLISH

T1T2 TR 1:00 (Doug Thorpe) – Foundation class

A former colleague used to complain “How do you convince a student that Frost’s ‘Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening’ is NOT a poem about Santa Claus?” If we celebrate freedom of interpretation, must we then “discipline” rogue interpretations? In this course, we will study how the practices of reading and the making of interpretations have always been sharply contested. We will look for a common language for relating diverse critical approaches to each other. Critical consensus may prove to be elusive, but a sense of shared activity and sparking intersections will teach us much about how we read, both individually and as a collectivity. We will sample influential contemporary critical approaches and read literary texts as test cases.


ENG 290.6 (01) INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH LINGUISTICS AND THE HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

T1T2 MWF 9:30 (Yin Liu) – Foundation class

This course traces the history of the English language. We will begin with an overview of basic linguistic concepts and then survey the development of English from the present day back to its origins as an Indo-European language. We will discover more than we knew about a language that we thought we knew. Why is English spelling so weird? What are the oldest words in English? What did English sound like five hundred or a thousand years ago? How have other languages influenced English? How might English (possibly) not be a language? Take this course and find out.

200-Level Classes

ENG 209.3 (01) TRANSNATIONAL LITERATURES

T1 MWF 11:30 (Joanne Leow) – Category 4 

Migration, forced migration. Immigrant, illegal. Expatriate, refugee. In this course we will read border-crossing fiction, poetry, and drama that nuance, challenge, and contest these terms. We will explore the transnational, diasporic, and refugee experiences written from the perspectives of individuals and communities that are dwelling across borders. How does the experience of border-crossing shape literary texts? How do literary texts contribute to our understanding of the boundaries between nations? How have the forces of imperialism, globalization, and greater labor mobility been reflected in the writings of those in diaspora? We will begin by reading some theories of diaspora, transnationalism, and exile before turning to a range of texts that attempt to make sense of our interconnected, global existence. Possible readings include texts by Toni Morrison, Chang-rae Lee, Hiromi Goto, Karen Tei Yamashita, Mohsin Hamid, lê thi diem thúy, Marie Clements, Jhumpa Lahiri, Gloria Anzaldua, and Viet Thanh Nguyen.


ENG 215.3 (62) LIFE WRITING

T2 TR 11:30 (Cynthia Wallace) – Non-category

What does a medieval woman’s account of passionate piety have to do with your Instagram? How do nineteenth-century letters and postmodern poetry relate to Tumblr? How can writing shape a life, both on and off the page? In this course we will consider several types of life writing—autobiography and biography, essays and memoir, dairies and letters, Tweets and blogs—in order to explore questions of how life writing works to construct a self, why it appeals to both writers and readers, and the ways its forms have changed over time. Students will also practice life writing of their own, in both longer formats and 140-character prose.


ENG 217.3 (61) MYTHOLOGIES OF NORTHERN EUROPE

T1 TR 10:00 (Michael Cichon) – Non-category

A study of the mythologies of medieval northern Europe, including a survey of the sources, an examination of several chief deities and myths associated with them, and a consideration of some old northern European literary evidence. This year, students in ENG 217 will study Thunder Road, the Four Branches of the Mabinogi, the Tain, and the Poetic Edda.


ENG 220.3 (01) STUDIES IN THE CRAFT OF WRITING

T1 TR 11:30 (Sheri Benning) – Non-category

Through close readings of contemporary literature, students will hone skills required for writing original poetry and prose (short fiction, novels/novellas, and/or creative non-fiction). In addition to reckoning with elements of style in both genres (i.e. figurative language, prosody, narrative stance, character and plot), students will explore the varied aesthetic and/or sociopolitical underpinnings of assigned readings to consider how form and content exist in a mutually enlivening relationship. The course includes both lectures and writing workshops in which students will discuss assigned readings, undertake in-class writing exercises, and engage in line-by-line editing critique of original writing by class members. Visiting authors may be invited into the classroom, and students will be encouraged to attend literary events in the community. By the course’s end, students should have completed a portfolio of polished writing in two genres. 


ENG 224.3 (Online) SHAKESPEARE: COMEDY AND HISTORY

T1 (TBA) and T2 (TBA) – Category 2

Note: Students with credit for ENG 221.6 or 321.6 may not take this class for credit.

This course focuses on the romantic comedies and English history plays that Shakespeare wrote for Elizabethan audiences in the first half of his theatre career. It also examines the darker, more tragicomic “problem comedies” that he wrote under James I. Study of the histories will demonstrate their contribution to the nationalist project of Reformation England, while study of the comedies will explore their use of humour and verbal wit in the representation of human identity.


ENG 224.3 (02) SHAKESPEARE: COMEDY AND HISTORY

T2 MWF 10:30 (Danila Sokolov) – Category 2

Note: Students with credit for ENG 221.6 or 321.6 may not take this class for credit.

This course will study two plays from William Shakespeare’s second Henriad (Henry IV Part One and Henry V) and a selection of comedies from across his career as dramatist (A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Much Ado About Nothing, and Measure for Measure). Shakespeare’s histories reflect the nationalist project of Reformation England and explore questions of national destiny, kingship, tyranny, succession, rebellion, and war from a variety of perspectives (political, legal, moral, and theatrical). Meanwhile, his comedies display a continuous and acute interest in the body as a locus of pain and pleasure, in the origins and uses of laughter, in the potentialities of language and verbal wit, and in the limits and stability of human identity. Through detailed analyses of five plays, we will investigate Shakespeare’s innovative approach to genre, the intricacies of his language, the depth of his poetic imagination, the richness of allusion to the historical, cultural, and social issues of Renaissance England, and the insistent probing of the conventions and material realities of the early modern theatre.


ENG 225.3 (01) SHAKESPEARE: TRAGEDY AND ROMANCE

T1 TR 1:00 (Danila Sokolov) – Category 2

Note: Students with credit for ENG 221.6 or 321.6 may not take this class for credit.

This course will study two “political” tragedies (Julius Caesar and Macbeth) and two “love” tragedies (Romeo and Juliet and Antony and Cleopatra) as well as one romance by William Shakespeare. In his tragedies, Shakespeare adopts the classical genre to explore the tragic conflicts of love and death, power and responsibility, ambition and despair, and revenge and forgiveness. In his late romances, he pushes the boundaries of comedy and tragedy to imagine a world in which harmony emerges out of loss and happiness comes as a reward for suffering. Through detailed analyses of five plays, we will investigate Shakespeare’s innovative approach to genre, the intricacies of his language, the depth of his poetic imagination, the richness of allusion to the historical, cultural, and social issues of Renaissance England, and the insistent probing of the conventions and material realities of the early modern theatre.


ENG 225.3 (Online) SHAKESPEARE: TRAGEDY AND ROMANCE

T2 (TBA) – Category 2

Note: Students with credit for ENG 221.6 or 321.6 may not take this class for credit. 

Throughout his career Shakespeare wrote tragedies of romantic love, family and political conflict, and revenge, reaching his peak in this genre in the first decade of the seventeenth century. This course will focus on a selection of plays in this genre, and will also treat his late romances, a comic genre in which fateful adventures end in forgiveness and reconciliation between enemies.


ENG 226.3 (Online) FANTASY AND SPECULATIVE FICTION

T1 (TBA) – Non-category

Speculative fiction includes literary genres that explore alternative worlds, experiment with the bounds of the real, and challenge the norms of reading. This course moves from the study of precursors in legend, folktale, and romance, to Victorian fantasy, science fiction, utopian and dystopian fiction, and to late twentieth- and early twenty-first-Century feminist revisionary narratives.


ENG 226.3 (02) FANTASY AND SPECULATIVE FICTION

T2 MWF 12:30 (Kevin Flynn) – Non-category

Speculative fiction includes literary genres that explore alternative worlds, experiment with the bounds of the real, and challenge the norms of reading. This course moves from the study of precursors in legend, folktale, and romance, to Victorian fantasy, science fiction, utopian and dystopian fiction, and to late twentieth- and early twenty-first-Century feminist revisionary narratives.


ENG 230.3 (61) LITERATURE FOR CHILDREN

T1 TR 11:30 (TBA) – Non-category

This course studies literature written or adopted for children and young adult readers. Emphasis is placed on the historical significance of key forms, such as fables, folk stories, fairy tales, and nursery rhymes, as well as later developments in drama, poetry, and prose fiction, including fantasy, realism, animal stories, historical fiction, and the young adult “problem novel.” The interplay between oral, written, and visual texts will be considered, as will the cultural contexts that inform changing attitudes towards children, childhood, and adolescence.


ENG 232.3 (01) GOTHIC NARRATIVE

T1 MWF 10:30 (Lindsey Banco) – Non-category

From Mary Shelley’s 1818 novel Frankenstein to Ari Aster’s 2018 film Hereditary, horror fiction and film owe a significant debt to the gothic mode. This course offers a survey of gothic literature from its beginnings in the middle of the eighteenth century, through its enormous popularity in the nineteenth century, to the multitude of forms it takes—including the contemporary horror novel and film—in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. In approaching the Gothic mode’s key questions, its main thematic issues, and its recurring stylistic features, this course will explore changes in our understanding of terror, the irrational, and the supernatural. What does it mean to transgress the boundaries between good and evil, safety and danger, sane and insane, and human and non- (or in-) human? What roles do violence, ghosts, decay, madness, racial and gender anxiety, and regional hauntings have in our literary traditions? Students are forewarned that the gothic is sometimes disturbing, frightening, or violent; some of the material in this course may be as well.


ENG 242.3 (online) INDIGENOUS STORYTELLING OF THE PRAIRIES

T1 (TBA) – Category 4, Canadian

This course examines Indigenous literatures from the prairie region of Canada, providing students with knowledge of the terms and issues central to an engaged study of Indigenous literatures. Topics to be covered include the art of storytelling; the relationship between oral and written literatures; collaborative storytelling; untold stories, including stories of racism and oppression; cultural and individual trauma; and resistance and recovery. The course also provides students with knowledge of historical and political contexts specific to the prairies.


ENG 242.3 (02) INDIGENOUS STORYTELLING OF THE PRAIRIES

T2 TR 10:00 (Jenna Hunnef) – Category 4, Canadian

This course introduces students to the diverse storytelling and intellectual traditions of the Prairies and Great Plains region of Turtle Island by focusing on the role of place—and more specifically the category of home—in Indigenous literary self-representation. How do Indigenous stories about relationships to the Prairies as a place—whether rural, urban, reserve, bush, or otherwise—negotiate the multiple and often competing racial, sexual, gendered, and economic forces that define life under settler colonialism? How do these representations resist settler colonialism’s investment in undoing those relationships? How might we locate issues of global concern in these hyperlocal realities? Students will be encouraged to think about their own relationships to place through formal and informal assignments and class discussions.


ENG 246.3 (02) SHORT FICTION

T2 MWF 1:30 (Ludmilla Voitkovska) – Non-category

As a relatively new genre, the short story is a truly modern form. Its attractiveness has to do with the concision of its form and the possibilities for startling turns its narrative can offer. The course will explore the history and conventions of short fiction from its origins in myth, fable, and folktale to its flourishing in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It will examine stories from a variety of cultural contexts representing a range of styles, themes and social issues. Among authors studied will be Aesop, Chekhov, Maupassant, Kafka, Munro, Achebe, Poe, Joyce, Conrad, Faulkner, and Chopin.


ENG 253.6 (01) CANADIAN LITERATURE IN ENGLISH

T1T2 MWF 2:30 (Kevin Flynn) – Category 4, Canadian

“Where is here?” is a central question posed by Canadian literary critic Northrop Frye. Frye argues that for Canadians and their literatures, the question of place is more central than the question of personal identity, “Who am I?” This 6-credit-unit course interrogates and revises Frye’s assertion by examining literary works that focus not only on geographical place, but also on social and cultural positioning. Lectures and class discussions will consider Canadian fiction and poetry from its earliest manifestations to the present day, as well as some examples of life writing and drama. The course will highlight the development of a Canadian literary tradition through attention to explorer-settler perspectives on Canada; Canadian nationalism after Confederation; Canadian iterations of modernism and postmodernism; and literary constructions of Canadian experience by prairie writers, Indigenous writers, and Canadian diasporic writers.


ENG 260.3 (02) CRIME AND DETECTIVE FICTION

T2 TR 2:30 (Ann Martin) – Non-category

At once a mass-marketed commodity, a spectacle full of scandal and suspense, and a puzzle that requires sophisticated reasoning and a knowledge of social etiquette, crime and detective fiction illuminates the shifting line between high and low art—and the contradictions of modern morality. We will explore a selection of texts to suss out the meanings of the figure of the sleuth, the setting of the case, the structure of the plot, and the style of the writing. Starting with Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys, we’ll shift back in time to Renaissance crime and broadside ballads before moving to the Paris of Dupin, the London of Sherlock Holmes, the Edinburgh of Inspector Rebus, and the Vancouver of Eden Robinson. How do contemporary texts, examples of the Golden Age, and works of film noir play with the conventions of this genre? As importantly, what are the implications of crime and detective fiction in a post-truth world?


ENG 277.3 (61) LITERARY USES OF MYTHOLOGY

T1 MWF 9:30 (Sarah Powrie) – Non-category

Sallust describes myth as “things that never happened but always are.” His enigmatic statement prompts us to consider the power of mythic narrative: why would stories about imaginary people continue to fascinate us and resonate with our own experience? Using Ovid’s Metamorphoses as a point of departure, we will study the many ways in which Ovid’s tales of transformation were themselves transformed through poetry, film and visual art to express the anxieties and aspirations of an array or authors. Among the various cultural iterations to be included are: Orpheus in the German poetry of Rainer Maria Rilke, the textual labyrinths of the Argentinian writer Jorge Luis Borges, and Narcissus in the media theory of Marshall McLuhan.


ENG 277.3 (online) LITERARY USES OF MYTHOLOGY

T2 (TBA) – Non-category

This course introduces the theory of myth and selected examples of the classical and other myths most frequently adapted and reinterpreted in literature in English. It emphasizes the ways in which different writers can find different significances in the same myth.


ENG 288.3 (02) INTRODUCTION TO FILM

T2 TR 11:30 Lab T 4:00 (Gerald White) – Category 5

This course will seek to introduce students to the fundamentals of film analysis. We will cover topics such as cinematography, editing, mise-en-scène, sound, etc. We will also seek to cover a wide variety of filmmaking traditions, including documentary, animation, experimental, and political cinema, and will pay attention to cinema from north of the 49th (and a bit of cinema from north of the 60th). In addition to standard two-hour features, the screening sessions will also feature short films and one or two very long films.