Junior English

Please note:

  • 6 cu 100-level English is the maximum that can be taken for credit, with the exception of ENG 120 Introduction to Creative Writing, which may be taken for an additional 3-cu general credit.
  • 6 cu at the 100 level is a prerequisite for 200-level English classes.

 


ENG 111.3 Literature and Composition: Reading Poetry

     Offered at various times in T1 and T2; check the dynamic schedule for details.
     Note: Only 6 credit units of ENG 110 through 114 may be taken for credit.

An introduction to the major forms of poetry in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.


ENG 112.3 Literature and Composition: Reading Drama

     Offered at various times in T1 and T2; check the dynamic schedule for details.
     Note: Only 6 credit units of ENG 110 through 114 may be taken for credit.

An introduction to major forms of dramatic activity in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.


ENG 113.3 Literature and Composition: Reading Narrative

     Offered at various times in T1 and T2; check the dynamic schedule for details.
     Note: Only 6 credit units of ENG 110 through 114 may be taken for credit.

An introduction to the major forms of narrative literature in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.


ENG 114.3: Literature and Composition Reading Culture

Offered at various times in T1 and T2; check the dynamic schedule for details.
Note: Only 6 credit units of ENG 110 through 114 may be taken for credit.

An introduction to historical and contemporary cultural forms in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition. Class themes will vary according to instructor choice; see below for details.


114.3 (01) Introduction to Literature and Composition: Reading Culture
“Humour in Literature”  

T1  Online, Asynchronous & Synchronous F  12:30 or 1:30 (Peter Robinson)

It is usual to think of literature as serious: and the more serious literature is, the less funny it is. In fact, humorous literature is as old as literature itself, and this course will explore the many kinds of humour to be found in literature. The course will range from Greek plays, through butt-jokes in Geoffrey Chaucer and William Shakespeare, to Stephen Leacock, Joseph Heller and Monty Python. Especially, the course will explore ways in which literature can be simultaneously both  seriously funny and funnily serious.


 114.3 (05) Introduction to Literature and Composition: Reading Culture
"The Country and the City"  

T1  MWF  10:30 (Gerald White)

We will spend the course thinking about how these seemingly opposed parts of society support, oppose and interact with one another.  We'll look at a number of different genres (short story, poem, play, novel, memoir, essay) from the 18th to 21st centuries, from countries including England, Ireland, Nigeria, and the US.  About half of the course will deal with works by Canadian authors.  We will also deal with some film and radio works.


114.3 (07) Introduction to Literature and Composition: Reading Culture
“Writing the End of the World”  

T1  Online, Asynchronous & Synchronous F  9:30 or 10:30 (Wendy Roy)

Why are end-of-the world narratives, or end-of-the-world as we know it narratives, so popular? And why are more and more so-called literary authors writing apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic fiction? This class will examine such questions through novels such as Nevil Shute’s On the Beach, David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas, Emily St. John Mandel’s Station Eleven, and Cherie Dimaline’s The Marrow Thieves, as well as short stories and poems by authors from the English-speaking world. Students will draw on their own cultural experiences — popular as well as academic — to enhance their literary knowledge and their communication skills. They will learn how literary models, terms, and techniques both shape and help us to understand historical and contemporary cultural forms. Through study of the literary works, students will have the opportunity to improve their analytical, reading, and writing skills. Please note that some course texts address difficult subject matter, although hopeful narratives are also included.


114.3 (09) Introduction to Literature and Composition: Reading Culture
“The Monster Outside and the Monster Within” 

T1  Online, Asynchronous (Richard Harris)

This course, aside from the standard objectives of its description, will be devoted in about half its content to works of medieval composition, filled with monstrous antagonists, much violence, and impossibly courageous heroes and heroines who battle such destructive inimical forces.  More modern selections will be concerned also with monstrosity, but of generally subtler sorts, having to do with internal rather than external challenges to our better humanity.  Be prepared for the study of cultures and their literatures beyond your likely familiar acquaintance! —it is from such experiences that we learn the most, about the world outside us, and about ourselves.


114.3 (02) Introduction to Literature and Composition: Reading Culture
“The Local and the Global”  

T2  Online, synchronous (Joanne Leow)

This course focuses on ideas of place through the lenses of the local and the global. This course will emphasize close readings of nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first century texts by artists and writers who have sought to understand and imagine their local settings and transnational networks.


 114.3 (04) Introduction to Literature and Composition: Reading Culture
“Writing the End of the World”  

T2  MWF  9:30 (Wendy Roy)

Why are end-of-the world narratives, or end-of-the-world as we know it narratives, so popular? And why are more and more so-called literary authors writing apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic fiction? This class will examine such questions through novels such as Nevil Shute’s On the Beach, David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas, Emily St. John Mandel’s Station Eleven, and Cherie Dimaline’s The Marrow Thieves, as well as short stories and poems by authors from the English-speaking world. Students will draw on their own cultural experiences — popular as well as academic — to enhance their literary knowledge and their communication skills. They will learn how literary models, terms, and techniques both shape and help us to understand historical and contemporary cultural forms. Through study of the literary works, students will have the opportunity to improve their analytical, reading, and writing skills. Please note that some course texts address difficult subject matter, although hopeful narratives are also included.


114.3 (10) Introduction to Literature and Composition: Reading Culture
“The Monster Outside and the Monster Within” 

T2  MWF  11:30 (Richard Harris)

This course, aside from the standard objectives of its description, will be devoted in about half its content to works of medieval composition, filled with monstrous antagonists, much violence, and impossibly courageous heroes and heroines who battle such destructive inimical forces.  More modern selections will be concerned also with monstrosity, but of generally subtler sorts, having to do with internal rather than external challenges to our better humanity.  Be prepared for the study of cultures and their literatures beyond your likely familiar acquaintance! —it is from such experiences that we learn the most, about the world outside us, and about ourselves.


 114.3 (66) Introduction to Literature and Composition: Reading Culture
“Disability in Culture”  

T2  TR  10:00 (Kylee-Anne Hingston)

In this section of Reading Culture, we will focus on reading representations of disability in culture. Although disability is still often seen as a medical issue (that is, as a physical or mental problem to be corrected or controlled), disability activists, artists, and scholars have been challenging that view since the 1970s. They argue that disability is a social issue, or as Toby Siebers puts it, that disability is “the effect of an environment hostile to some bodies and not to others, requiring advances in social justice rather than medicine.” In this class, we will apply the perspective and theories of these activists and scholars to analyze how disability is represented and understood in our culture—in ads, television, film, videos, poetry, short stories, plays, and novels.


ENG 120.3 Introduction to Creative Writing

      Offered at various times in T1 and T2; check the dynamic schedule for details.
     Note: ENG 120 counts as 3 credit units of 100-level English, BUT it may be taken for credit in addition to 6 credit
     units of ENG 110 through 114.

This course introduces students to strategies for writing original fiction, poetry, and/or creative non-fiction. The course will include both lectures and writing workshops in which students critique original writing by class members. Visiting authors may be invited into the classroom, and students will be encouraged to attend literary events in the community. By the end of the course, students will have a portfolio of polished writing in two or three genres.