Junior English

Please note:

  • 6 cu 100-level English is the maximum that can be taken for credit, with the exception of ENG 120 Introduction to Creative Writing, which may be taken for an additional 3-cu general credit.
  • 6 cu at the 100 level is a prerequisite for 200-level English classes.

 


ENG 111.3 Literature and Composition: Reading Poetry

     Offered at various times in T1 and T2; check the dynamic schedule for details.
     Note: Only 6 credit units of ENG 110 through 114 may be taken for credit.

An introduction to the major forms of poetry in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.


ENG 112.3 Literature and Composition: Reading Drama

     Offered at various times in T1 and T2; check the dynamic schedule for details.
     Note: Only 6 credit units of ENG 110 through 114 may be taken for credit.

An introduction to major forms of dramatic activity in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.


ENG 113.3 Literature and Composition: Reading Narrative

     Offered at various times in T1 and T2; check the dynamic schedule for details.
     Note: Only 6 credit units of ENG 110 through 114 may be taken for credit.

An introduction to the major forms of narrative literature in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.


ENG 114.3: Literature and Composition Reading Culture

Offered at various times in T1 and T2; check the dynamic schedule for details.
Note: Only 6 credit units of ENG 110 through 114 may be taken for credit.

An introduction to historical and contemporary cultural forms in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition. Class themes will vary according to instructor choice.

ENG 114.3 Introduction to Literature and Composition: Reading Culture
"Food for Thought"

Instructor - Joanne Leow

More than just a metaphor, cooks, writers, filmmakers, and other artists have thought about food intently through how we grow it, forage for it, hunt for it, cook it, eat it, buy it, sell it, imagine it, and connect through it. This section of ENG114 Reading Culture examines powerful and unforgettable representations of food in poetry, fiction, essay, and documentary film. In this course we will examine why it has been connected to the most important issues of our time: love, justice, labour, history, family, hunger, community, the environment, and culture. We will consider a wide range of readings from various cultural, geographical, and temporal contexts including Korean supermarkets in North America, seal hunting in Nunavut, ancient classical feasts, childhood meals in Barbados, hawker centres in Singapore, cattle farms in Kansas, and New York restaurant kitchens. Possible texts including the film Angry Inuk by Alethea Arnaquq-Baril, the memoir Crying in H-Mart by Michelle Zauner, and readings by Seamus Heaney, M.F.K. Fisher, Michael Pollan, Jonathan Swift, Herman Melville, Henry David Thoreau, Austin Clarke, Anthony Bourdain, Chang-Rae Lee, Calvin Trillin, and Jhumpa Lahiri.

ENG 114.3 Introduction to Literature and Composition: Reading Culture
"Humour"

Instructor - Peter Robinson

It is usual to think of literature as serious: and the more serious literature is, the less funny it is. In fact, humorous literature is as old as literature itself, and this course will explore the many kinds of humour to be found in literature, and more broadly in our culture. The course will range from butt-jokes in Geoffrey Chaucer and William Shakespeare, via Jonathan Swift and Oscar Wilde, to Stephen Leacock,Thomas King,Joker and Monty Python, with trips into the worlds of Indigenous and Feminist humor, and culminating in Roberto Benigni’s version of the Holocaust. We will be looking particularly at humor in performance: in film, youTube, Instagram, TikTok, stand-up, and all over the internet.  Especially, the course will explore ways in which literature can simultaneously be both seriously funny and funnily serious. 

ENG 114.3 Introduction to Literature and Composition: Reading Culture
“Writing the End of the World”  

Instructor - Wendy Roy

Why are end-of-the world narratives, or end-of-the-world as we know it narratives, so popular? And why are more and more so-called literary authors writing apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic fiction? This class will examine such questions through novels such as Nevil Shute’s On the Beach, Emily St. John Mandel’s Station Eleven, and Cherie Dimaline’s The Marrow Thieves, as well as short stories and poems by authors from the English-speaking world. Students will draw on their own cultural experiences — popular as well as academic — to enhance their literary knowledge and their communication skills. They will learn how literary models, terms, and techniques both shape and help us to understand historical and contemporary cultural forms. Through study of the literary works, students will have the opportunity to improve their analytical, reading, and writing skills. Please note that some course texts address difficult subject matter, although hopeful narratives are also included.

ENG 114.3 Introduction to Literature and Composition: Reading Culture
"Justice, Forgiveness, Love, Politics"

Instructor - William Bartley

We will study works of different genres from different historical periods that examine the nature of justice--how is it to be done? and by what authority? -- and how these questions intersect and are complicated by the competing claims of forgiveness, love, and politics in our daily lives. Some works students can expect to encounter: Hannah Arendt, Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil; William Shakespeare, King Lear:  Jane Smiley, A Thousand Acres; some stories by Raymond Carver and D.H. Lawrence: Sophocles, Antigone, Spike Lee, Do the Right Thing, Richard Magawese, Indian Horse; Herman Melville, Billy Budd, Sailor; Janel Lewis, The Wife of Martin Guerre.