Junior English

Please note:

  • 6 cu 100-level English is the maximum that can be taken for credit, with the exception of ENG 120 Introduction to Creative Writing, which may be taken for an additional 3-cu general credit.
  • 6 cu at the 100 level is a prerequisite for 200-level English classes.

ENG 110.6 Literature and Composition

     Offered at various times in T1T2; check the dynamic schedule for details.
     Note: Only 6 credit units of ENG 110 through 114 may be taken for credit.

An introduction to the main kinds of literature. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.


ENG 111.3 Literature and Composition: Reading Poetry

     Offered at various times in T1 and T2; check the dynamic schedule for details.
     Note: Only 6 credit units of ENG 110 through 114 may be taken for credit.

An introduction to the major forms of poetry in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.


ENG 112.3 Literature and Composition: Reading Drama

     Offered at various times in T1 and T2; check the dynamic schedule for details.
     Note: Only 6 credit units of ENG 110 through 114 may be taken for credit.

An introduction to major forms of dramatic activity in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.


ENG 113.3 Literature and Composition: Reading Narrative

     Offered at various times in T1 and T2; check the dynamic schedule for details.
     Note: Only 6 credit units of ENG 110 through 114 may be taken for credit.

An introduction to the major forms of narrative literature in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.


ENG 114.3 Literature and Composition: Reading Culture

     Offered at various times in T1 and T2; check the dynamic schedule for details.
     Note: Only 6 credit units of ENG 110 through 114 may be taken for credit.

An introduction to historical and contemporary cultural forms in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.


ENG 114.3 (01) (11) Instructor Brian Cotts

Science Fiction and the Fantastic

This course explores the culture of science as it manifests in a variety of literary forms and historical and/or contemporary media, visual and virtual as well as textual.


ENG 114.3 (03) (07) Instructor Joanne Leow

Reading the City

We live in an increasingly urban world, and writers from William Blake to David Chariandy have sought to understand and imagine the city in their work. In this course, we will read a wide range of literary and artistic representations that see the city as increasingly central to life in the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries. The course will emphasize the ongoing relevance of texts to our own everyday experience of the urban life — as a contact zone, an intense manifestation of development, gentrification, and globalization. 


ENG 114.3 (05) Instructor Lindsey Banco

Literature and Science

Let’s start with what this course is not: it is not a science course, nor is it a course on science fiction, nor is it only a course on literature. Instead, it will introduce students to a range of cultural experiences—“popular” as well as “high-brow”—that have to do with science. Many of these cultural experiences will be literary, but some will involve popular writing, film, television, and photography. 


ENG 114.3 (09) Instructor James Yeku

Culture and Ideology in Texts    

This course asks these questions: How do texts, whether in literary or other cultural forms, evoke and circulate ideological persuasions, and what is the place of the individual in the recognition of and resistance to particular manifestations of ideology in society? How can the form and content of literature be used both as a vehicle of ideology and as mechanisms for resisting its operations? 

ENG 114.3 (61) Instructor Kylee-Anne Hingston

Disability in Culture

In this class we will apply a disability-studies perspective to analyze how disability is represented and understood in Western cultural texts: ads, signs, architecture, television, film, videos, poetry, short stories, and novels.


ENG 114.3 (63) Instructor Emily Morris

Literary Love and Romance

This section of Reading Culture focuses on stories and depictions of love and romance in English literature from several periods. We will consider questions about how and why definitions and depictions of love have changed, whether it has become less important, how it is related to more practical or material aspects of life (money, for example), and if and why we are interested in love stories. We may contrast these typical “western” love stories with different cultural understandings of love and romance, and consider whether the way the stories are told changes the way we perceive love.​


ENG 114 (65) Instructor Jessica McDonald

Nature vs. Culture

Circling around the age-old tension between nature and culture, this course immerses students in the process of analyzing a variety of cultural texts: fiction, poetry, film, music, memoir, comics. We will discuss, analyze, and question the nature vs. culture dynamic in terms of 1) places, 2) bodies and identities, 3) animals, and 4) technologies.


ENG 120.3 Introduction to Creative Writing

     T1 TR 1:00, T2 TR 11:30 (Sheri Benning)
     Note: ENG 120 counts as 3 credit units of 100-level English, BUT it may be taken for credit in addition to 6 credit
     units of ENG 110 through 114.

This course introduces students to strategies for writing original fiction, poetry, and/or creative non-fiction. The course will include both lectures and writing workshops in which students critique original writing by class members. Visiting authors may be invited into the classroom, and students will be encouraged to attend literary events in the community. By the end of the course, students will have a portfolio of polished writing in two or three genres.