Junior English

Please note:

  • 6 cu 100-level English is the maximum that can be taken for credit, with the exception of ENG 120 Introduction to Creative Writing, which may be taken for an additional 3-cu general credit.
  • 6 cu at the 100 level is a prerequisite for 200-level English classes.

ENG 110.6 Literature and Composition

     Offered at various times in T1T2; check the dynamic schedule for details.
     Note: Only 6 credit units of ENG 110 through 114 may be taken for credit.

An introduction to the main kinds of literature. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.


ENG 111.3 Literature and Composition: Reading Poetry

     Offered at various times in T1 and T2; check the dynamic schedule for details.
     Note: Only 6 credit units of ENG 110 through 114 may be taken for credit.

An introduction to the major forms of poetry in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.


ENG 112.3 Literature and Composition: Reading Drama

     Offered at various times in T1 and T2; check the dynamic schedule for details.
     Note: Only 6 credit units of ENG 110 through 114 may be taken for credit.

An introduction to major forms of dramatic activity in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.


ENG 113.3 Literature and Composition: Reading Narrative

     Offered at various times in T1 and T2; check the dynamic schedule for details.
     Note: Only 6 credit units of ENG 110 through 114 may be taken for credit.

An introduction to the major forms of narrative literature in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.


ENG 114.3 Literature and Composition: Reading Culture

     Offered at various times in T1 and T2; check the dynamic schedule for details.
     Note: Only 6 credit units of ENG 110 through 114 may be taken for credit.

An introduction to historical and contemporary cultural forms in English. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.


ENG 114.3 (02) Instructor Sheheryar B Sheikh (Winter 2019)

Reading the End of the World

This course focuses on different literary representations of apocalypses from North America and India. Our central idea will be of revelation, especially the ‘lifting of veils’ that occurs when an individual, community, or the world is at the brink of its imminent end. Textual comparisons between short stories, poems, and plays from very different regions and times will inform how literature enables an understanding of global catastrophes and personal ones.  


ENG 114.3 (04) Instructor Guilano Gullotti (Winter 2019)

This section of English 114 focuses on the intimate relationship between the written text and music. We will read a wide range of literary and artistic representations that see literature and music as central to life in the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries, and that explore how both artistic expressions inform one another. The course will emphasize issues such as identity, memory and social movements.


ENG 114.3 (06) Instructor Richard Harris (Winter 2019)

The Monster Outside and the Monster Within

This course, aside from the standard objectives of its description, will be devoted in about half its content to works of medieval composition, filled with monstrous antagonists, much violence, and impossibly courageous heroes and heroines who battle such destructive inimical forces.  More modern selections will be concerned also with monstrosity, but of generally subtler sorts, having to do with internal rather than external challenges to our humanity.  Be prepared for the study of cultures and their literatures beyond your likely familiar acquaintance—it is from such experiences that we learn the most, about the world outside us, and about ourselves.


ENG 114.3 (10) (14) Instructor Tasha Beeds (Winter 2019)

Situating Land and Waterscapes in Literature: Place and Relations

This course will read land and waterscapes through a variety of cultural lenses, genres, and time periods. Some of the themes we will be covering include: connections and disconnections; colonial and de-colonial portraits of land and water; slavery and the transatlantic crossings; settler and Indigenous relationships to place; current land and water movements throughout the world; as well as the “place” of technology in relation to land and waterscapes.


ENG 114.3 (12) Instructor Brian Cotts (Winter 2019)

Science Fiction & the Fantastic

This class explores science fiction culture as it intersects with contemporary life.  Primarily, we will be discussing written works, but occasionally the class will also allow students to incorporate their interests in other media (film, video games, etc.).  Throughout the term we will look at works by both giants of the field, and well as lesser known but still significant figures.  Some of our authors may include, but are not limited to: Isaac Asimov, Mary Shelley, J. G. Ballard, Ursula K. leGuin, Robert Heinlein, C.L. Moore, William Gibson, Samuel R. Delany, Pat Cadigan, and Theodore Sturgeon.


ENG 114.3 (62) Instructor Kylee-Anne Hingston (Winter 2019)

Although disability is still often seen as a medical issue (as a physical or mental problem to be corrected or controlled), disability activists, artists, and scholars have been challenging that view since the 1970s. They argue that disability is a social issue, or as Toby Siebers puts it, “the effect of an environment hostile to some bodies and not to others, requiring advances in social justice rather than medicine.”

In this section of Reading Culture, we will apply the perspective and theories of these activists and scholars to analyze how disability is represented and understood in Western culture—in ads, television, film, videos, poetry, short stories, and novels.


ENG 114.3 (64) Instructor Shakti Brazier-Tompkins (Winter 2019)

Relationships in Literature. 

In this course, students will examine how personal relationships motivate and influence individuals, how cultural relationships motivate individual and group behaviour, and how our own immersion in relationship and culture influences our understandings of and reactions to the texts we read, the people we meet, and the world around us.  Through the study of texts as diverse as an ancient Greek play and a contemporary video game, students will learn how literary models, terms, and techniques both shape and help us to understand a broad range of historical and contemporary cultural forms.


ENG 114.3 (66) Instructor Dawn Friel-Hipperson (Winter 2019)

The purpose of English 114.3 – Literature & Composition: Reading Culture—is to consider the concepts of culture , sub-culture, cultural diversity, and context as presented in literature and to discuss how these concepts and considerations are relevant in today's world. In short, literature reflects society.  And you will draw on your readings, engage in class discussion, exercise your written communication skills, and present your reading of the literature through another and new lens.


ENG 114.3 (01) (11) Instructor Brian Cotts (Fall 2018)

Science Fiction and the Fantastic

This course explores the culture of science as it manifests in a variety of literary forms and historical and/or contemporary media, visual and virtual as well as textual.


ENG 114.3 (03) (07) Instructor Joanne Leow (Fall 2018)

Reading the City

We live in an increasingly urban world, and writers from William Blake to David Chariandy have sought to understand and imagine the city in their work. In this course, we will read a wide range of literary and artistic representations that see the city as increasingly central to life in the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries. The course will emphasize the ongoing relevance of texts to our own everyday experience of the urban life — as a contact zone, an intense manifestation of development, gentrification, and globalization. 


ENG 114.3 (05) Instructor Lindsey Banco (Fall 2018)

Literature and Science

Let’s start with what this course is not: it is not a science course, nor is it a course on science fiction, nor is it only a course on literature. Instead, it will introduce students to a range of cultural experiences—“popular” as well as “high-brow”—that have to do with science. Many of these cultural experiences will be literary, but some will involve popular writing, film, television, and photography. 


ENG 114.3 (09) Instructor James Yeku (Fall 2018)

Culture and Ideology in Texts    

This course asks these questions: How do texts, whether in literary or other cultural forms, evoke and circulate ideological persuasions, and what is the place of the individual in the recognition of and resistance to particular manifestations of ideology in society? How can the form and content of literature be used both as a vehicle of ideology and as mechanisms for resisting its operations? 

ENG 114.3 (61) Instructor Kylee-Anne Hingston (Fall 2018)

Disability in Culture

In this class we will apply a disability-studies perspective to analyze how disability is represented and understood in Western cultural texts: ads, signs, architecture, television, film, videos, poetry, short stories, and novels.


ENG 114.3 (63) Instructor Emily Morris (Fall 2018)

Literary Love and Romance

This section of Reading Culture focuses on stories and depictions of love and romance in English literature from several periods. We will consider questions about how and why definitions and depictions of love have changed, whether it has become less important, how it is related to more practical or material aspects of life (money, for example), and if and why we are interested in love stories. We may contrast these typical “western” love stories with different cultural understandings of love and romance, and consider whether the way the stories are told changes the way we perceive love.​


ENG 114 (65) Instructor Jessica McDonald (Fall 2018)

Nature vs. Culture

Circling around the age-old tension between nature and culture, this course immerses students in the process of analyzing a variety of cultural texts: fiction, poetry, film, music, memoir, comics. We will discuss, analyze, and question the nature vs. culture dynamic in terms of 1) places, 2) bodies and identities, 3) animals, and 4) technologies.


ENG 120.3 Introduction to Creative Writing

     T1 TR 1:00, T2 TR 11:30 (Sheri Benning)
     Note: ENG 120 counts as 3 credit units of 100-level English, BUT it may be taken for credit in addition to 6 credit
     units of ENG 110 through 114.

This course introduces students to strategies for writing original fiction, poetry, and/or creative non-fiction. The course will include both lectures and writing workshops in which students critique original writing by class members. Visiting authors may be invited into the classroom, and students will be encouraged to attend literary events in the community. By the end of the course, students will have a portfolio of polished writing in two or three genres.