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Physics professor recognized by American Physical Society

Posted on 2017-11-28 in Science & Technology

Chary Rangacharyulu

“For his worldwide contributions to enhance diversity and excellence in physics and science,” Professor Chary Rangacharyulu of the Department of Physics & Engineering Physics has been elected a fellow of the American Physical Society (APS).

Each year, APS elects a small portion of its more than 54,000 members as fellows: an honour that recognizes exceptional contributions to research, education or service in physics.

An active researcher involved in several international collaborations, Rangacharyulu’s areas of focus include nuclear and elementary particle physics, quantum theory, and physics education. He has been widely recognized for his efforts at promoting youth science education through initiatives such as the Canada-Wide Science Fair, the International Biology Olympiad and the College of Arts & Science’s Science Ambassador Program.

 

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