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Talk: The shíshálh Archaeological Research Project

Posted in Science & Technology
Oct 20, 2017

Digital reconstruction. (Photo: Philippe Froesch / Visual Forensic)

The Saskatoon Archaeological Society presents:

T’i s-tsitsiy-im-ut-Ɂe (They worked here): The shíshálh Archaeological Research Project (sARP)
by Terence Clark

Friday, Oct. 20
7:00pm
Room 132, Archaeology Building

Abstract

This talk will discuss the results of the shíshálh Archaeological Research Project, a longterm collaborative project based in Sechelt, BC. SARP has uncovered the most elaborate pre-contact burials yet known in Canada, with one individual interred with over 350,000 ground stone beads. This talk will discuss previous fieldwork activities and outline the future directions of the project. Topics will include coastal survey, shell midden excavation, public archaeology, museum exhibitions, landscapes of meaning, community-based research, and mortuary archaeology.

Terence Clark is a recent addition to the University of Saskatchewan, Department of Archaeology and Anthropology. He is the director of the shíshálh Archaeological Research Project (sARP), a community-based collaboration of the University of Saskatchewan, the University of Toronto, and the shíshálh Nation. He was previously the Curator of Western Canadian Archaeology at the Canadian Museum of History. He has spent over 20 years working on the Northwest Coast, excavating hundreds of sites, and working closely with dozens of Indigenous communities. His areas of interest are community-based archaeology, hunter-fisher-gatherers, computational archaeology, and landscape archaeology.

 

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