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The University of Saskatchewan and the First World War

Posted on 2017-04-11 in Students & Campus Life

University of Saskatchewan Archives and Special Collections, MG32

By 1916, James Brydon, Thomas Caldwell and dozens of other students from the University of Saskatchewan had joined the Canadian Expeditionary Force and seen frontline combat during the First World War. During the four-day Battle of Vimy Ridge, both Brydon and Caldwell died along with seven other students from the U of S and more than 3,500 Canadians in total. By the end of the war, at least 70 soldiers from the University of Saskatchewan had died during combat.

Kevin Winterhalt, an undergraduate student in the Department of History, has developed an online exhibit highlighting the university's role in the Great War as part of a digital methods and digital humanities course.

Two exhibitions about the First World War also opened at the Diefenbaker Canada Centre in April. Deo et Patriae - For God and Country: The University of Saskatchewan and The Great War is an original exhibition about the U of S community’s role in the war, while Vimy - Battle. Memorial. Icon. is a traveling exhibition from the Canadian War Museum about the Battle of Vimy Ridge.

More information:

Student online exhibit: The University of Saskatchewan and the First World War

Current exhibits at the Diefenbaker Canada Centre

 

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