Introduction

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers a course-based (project based) M.Math., a thesis-based M.Sc., and a Ph.D. degree with the following research fields:


Separate from this, our Department is a part of the Collaborative Biostatistics Program, a collaborative graduate program between the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, the Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, and the School of Public Health at the University of Saskatchewan.

For core courses, and other specific information in each specialization, click on the above links.

Details about course-based M.Math., thesis-based M.Sc. and Ph.D programs are given below.

For a thesis-based M.Sc. and a Ph.D. degree, the student will conduct research normally supervised by a research supervisor. For information on research groups and research interests of our faculty members, see the “Research” item in the top menu.

For application procedures, see this page “Application Procedures” menu tab.

Programs: Our Department offers the following degree programs.

This is a non-thesis program with the minimum course requirement of 30 cu (10 half courses). This program is intended for those interested in acquiring a diverse knowledge of mathematics, without having to demonstrate the ability of conducting independent research.

The minimum residency required for the course-based M.Math program is 12 months. Typically, a student will complete the program within two years.



The normal course requirement for a fully qualified candidate is 15 credit units (5 half courses).
The research for the M.Sc. thesis and the thesis preparation are supervised by the research supervisor. The student is required to submit a thesis showing deep understanding of the subject and containing a worthwhile contribution to knowledge. The candidate must pass an oral examination based on the work in the thesis.

The minimum residency required for the thesis-based M.Sc. program is 12 months. In most cases, students take between two and three years to complete the M.Sc. program.
The course requirement in the Ph.D. program is 9 - 18 credit units, depending on the student's academic background. The number of required courses is to be determined by the student's Advisory Committee. 
A student registering in the Ph.D. program must pass a Qualifying Exam within the first 13 months to demonstrate sufficient knowledge in one of three possible specialization areas of mathematics and statistics, depending on his/her specialization. A student will be allowed two opportunities to pass the qualifying exams. Failure to pass the qualifying exams on the second attempt will result in the student’s withdrawal from the program. Ph.D. qualifying exams are given in May and again in late August - early September.
After the student has completed all course requirements for the Ph.D., the student will be required to pass a Comprehensive Exam.  The Comprehensive Exam is an oral examination conducted by the Advisory Committee and is intended to ensure the student is prepared to begin work on a proposed area of research. 

The research for the Ph.D. thesis and the thesis preparation are normally supervised by the research supervisor. The student is required to submit a thesis containing a worthwhile contribution to knowledge and warranting publication. The adequacy of the thesis is decided by an examining committee consisting of the Advisory Committee and an External examiner from outside this University. The candidate must pass an oral examination based on the work in the thesis.

The minimum residency required for the Ph.D. program is 24 months. 

Transfer from M.Sc. to Ph.D. program

A student who registers in the M.Sc. program in September (resp. in January) and wishes to be considered for transfer to the Ph.D. program, without completing the M.Sc. degree, must pass the Ph.D. qualifying examination within 13 months (resp. 17 months) of first registration for the M.Sc. degree. Only under extraordinary circumstances and at the discretion of the Graduate Committee may a student enrolled in the M.Sc. program for more than 12 months be considered for transfer to a Ph.D. program. A M.Sc. student who fails the Ph.D. qualifying exam, then completes the M.Sc. and is admitted into the Ph.D. program, will be allowed only one more attempt to pass the qualifying exam.