Please note:

  • 6 cu 100-level English is a prerequisite for 200-level English classes and is the maximum to be taken for credit
  • 3 cu at the 200 level is a pre- or co-requisite for most 300-level English classes (exceptions: ENG 301, 310, and 366)
  • Students interested in Honours English are encouraged to take at least one Foundations class in second year.
  • This information is accurate as of March 31, 2018. Please note the University of Saskatchewan reserves the right to cancel or reschedule any classes. For the most up-to-date information, please click here.

Foundation Classes

ENG 202.6 (01) READING THE CANON: TEXTS AND CONTEXTS

T1T2  MWF 9:30  (Sarah Powrie)

Foundation Class

The English literary canon has been a fraught and fiercely debated notion. Critics argue that the Western canon is elitist and outdated, that it is ethnocentric and sexist since it privileges European male voices while excluding the diverse array of post-colonial Anglophone writers. Defenders argue that the canon is a-cultural and a-historical, that great writers write about experiences common to the human condition, that a canon-less curriculum would not only erode the understanding of the literary past but would also fragment literary studies into a multitude of unrelated sub-specialized fields. This course seeks to engage this cultural debate through the study of the English literary canon. Charting the tradition from “Beowulf to Virginia Woolf” and beyond, we will examine works of influential and lesser known authors alike. Each author begins his/her career as an outsider to an established literary tradition, and so we will consider the strategies that various authors use to insinuate themselves amid “the greats” or to distance themselves from their predecessors. What do premodern canons tell us about our own notions of literary authority? To what extent do writers draw upon or depart from the literary tradition that they claim to represent? Might we speak of a plurality of canons, and how might they relate to the traditionally configured Western canon? What are the values and identities at stake in either constructing or challenging a literary canon?

ENG 204.6 (01) HISTORY AND FUTURE OF THE BOOK

T1T2  MWF 2:30  (Yin Liu, Brent Nelson)

Foundation Class

“History and Future of the Book” is designed to introduce students to historical and contemporary developments in the technology and impact of the book. It focuses on several inter-related aspects of the book’s history and its prospects:

  • the development of media, from clay tablets through bound leaves of parchment or paper, to contemporary e-books and web pages;
  • the relationship between the medium of expression and literary expression;
  • the history of reading;
  • the book’s ideological power and the history of its suppression; and
  • the relationships between the history of the book and the culture of digital texts.

In the process, we will explore medieval manuscripts; the invention and impact of the Gutenberg printing press; the origins (and futures) of the encyclopedia; the development of copyright law in the eighteenth century and its contemporary transformation; censorship; the social impact of mass-produced books and of digital texts; and the relationships between media and literature. We will consider some recent developments in electronic literature, publishing, and book culture and the long history of the book that informed them. At every stage we will ask whether recent developments in communication technology compel us to ask new questions and seek new answers, or return us to old questions in new ways.

200-Level Classes

ENG 206.3 (02) INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL STUDIES

T2  MWF 10:30  (Lindsey Banco) 

Category 5

Cultural studies is the exploration of “culture,” what Raymond Williams calls nothing less than “one of the two or three most complicated words in the English language.” Cultural studies is the interdisciplinary analysis of the artistic, social, political, and historical texts and objects that populate our contemporary lives. It assumes that such objects go well beyond “mere entertainment” or “mere utility” and affect deeply how we perceive class, race, gender, and other markers of identity. As an introduction to the theory and practice of cultural studies, this course will familiarize students with some of the most important thinkers and methodologies in the field. In addition to learning some of the major theoretical approaches to cultural studies, students will use some of the tools of critical analysis to analyze different forms of cultural production, including literature, popular culture, and print and electronic media. Texts will include novels, popular writing, advertising, film, music, visual culture of various kinds, and digital culture such as social networking and online celebrity culture. This course will offer many opportunities for reflection and writing on texts, cultural styles, and media environments.

ENG 207.3 (02) DECOLONIZING LITERATURES

T2  MWF 1:30  (Joanne Leow) 

Category 4

From London to Lagos, Mumbai to Manila, Singapore to Vancouver, colonial and (post)colonial cities have long been contact zones where the processes of exploitation and exchange have been sustained and amplified. This course will read decolonizing literatures that have powerfully altered the social and cultural textures of these cities, examining how imperial languages, power structures, and spaces have been critiqued, hybridized, and creolized. After reading some foundational postcolonial and decolonial theory, we will examine contemporary literary and cultural texts from these urban contexts, and consider their mediation of the shifting forces of empire, neocolonialism, and decolonization. Possible texts include novels by Sam Selvon, Chinua Achebe, Aravind Adiga, Lydia Kwa, and Dionne Brand, and short stories by Wayde Compton, Zadie Smith, and Eden Robinson.

ENG 215.3 (62) LIFE WRITING

T2 TR 1:00  (Cynthia Wallace)

Non-category

What does a medieval woman’s account of passionate piety have to do with your Instagram? How do nineteenth-century letters and postmodern poetry relate to Tumblr? How can writing shape a life, both on and off the page? In this course we will consider several types of life writing—autobiography and biography, essays and memoir, dairies and letters, Tweets and blogs—in order to explore questions of how life writing works to construct a self, why it appeals to both writers and readers, and the ways its forms have changed over time. Students will also practice life writing of their own, in both longer formats and 140-character prose.

ENG 224.3 (02) SHAKESPEARE: COMEDY AND HISTORY

T1  MWF 11:30  (Joanne Rochester) 

Category 2

Note: Students with credit for ENG 221.6 or 321.6 may not take this class for credit.

This course treats Shakespeare’s plays as historical and theatrical documents, in the context of Shakespeare’s playing spaces and practices. We will read three comedies about conflict in love, sex and marriage: the early play Love’s Labour’s Lost, Much Ado About Nothing, and the rarely studied The Merry Wives of Windsor. We’ll also do two histories, Richard II and Henry IV. Both plays are from Shakespeare’s second tetralogy, the later of Shakespeare’s two multi-part cycles of plays on the medieval civil wars, the Wars of the Roses, which are among the earliest plays he wrote. The comic figure Sir John Falstaff is introduced in the Henry IV plays, and The Merry Wives of Windsor seems to have been written explicitly to provide a comic showcase for him, providing an interesting link between the histories and the comedies.

ENG 224.3 (Online) SHAKESPEARE: COMEDY AND HISTORY

T1  (TBA)

Category 2

Note: Students with credit for ENG 221.6 or 321.6 may not take this class for credit.

This course will focus on the romantic comedies and English history plays that Shakespeare wrote for Elizabethan audiences in the first half of his theatre career; it will also include the darker, more tragicomic “problem comedies” that he wrote under James I.

ENG 224.3 (02) SHAKESPEARE: COMEDY AND HISTORY

T2  TR 2:30 (Danila Sokolov)  

Category 2

Note: Students with credit for ENG 221.6 OR 321.6 may not take this class for credit.

This course will study Shakespeare’s second Henriad (Richard II, Henry IV Part One, and Henry V) and a selection of comedies from across his career as dramatist (The Comedy of Errors, As You Like It, and Measure for Measure). Shakespeare’s histories reflect the nationalist project of Reformation England under Queen Elizabeth and explore questions of national destiny, kingship, tyranny, succession, rebellion, and war from a variety of perspectives (political, legal, moral, and theatrical). Meanwhile, his comedies, from the slapstick humour of The Comedy of Errors and the titillating cross-dressing of As You Like It to the violence of Measure for Measure, display a continuous and acute interest in the body as a locus of pain and pleasure, in the origins and uses laughter, in the potentialities of language and verbal wit, and in the limits and stability of human identity.

ENG 225.3 (02) SHAKESPEARE: TRAGEDY AND ROMANCE

T1  TR 2:30  (Danila Sokolov)

Category 2

Note: Students with credit for ENG 221.6 or 321.6 may not take this class for credit.

This course will study a selection of Shakespeare’s tragedies and romances. In his tragedies Titus Andronicus, Hamlet, Macbeth, and Othello, Shakespeare adopts the classical genre to explore the tragic conflicts of love and death, power and responsibility, ambition and despair, and revenge and forgiveness. In his late romances Cymbeline and The Tempest, he pushes the boundaries of comedy and tragedy to imagine a world in which harmony emerges out of loss and happiness comes as a reward for suffering. Through detailed analysis of the six plays, we will investigate Shakespeare’s innovative approach to genre, the intricacies of his language, the depth of his poetic imagination, the richness of allusion to the historical, cultural, and social issues of Renaissance England, and the insistent probing of the conventions and material realities of the early modern theatre.

ENG 225.3 (02) SHAKESPEARE: TRAGEDY AND ROMANCE

T2  MWF 11:30  (Joanne Rochester)

Category 2

Note: Students with credit for ENG 221.6 or 321.6 may not take this class for credit.

This course treats Shakespeare’s plays as historical and theatrical documents, in the context of Shakespeare’s playing spaces and practices. We will read at least four of Shakespeare’s tragedies, ranging from Romeo and Juliet and Hamlet, through the equally bloody Coriolanus and Julius Caesar. We will finish with the late romance The Tempest, a tragicomedy that marks the end of Shakespeare’s play with theatre.

ENG 225.3 (Online STM) SHAKESPEARE: TRAGEDY AND ROMANCE

T2  (TBA)

Category 2

Note: Students with credit for ENG 221.6 or 321.6 may not take this class for credit.

Throughout his career Shakespeare wrote tragedies of romantic love, family and political conflict, and revenge, reaching his peak in this genre in the first decade of the seventeenth century. This course will focus on a selection of plays in this genre, and will also treat his late romances, a comic genre in which fateful adventures end in forgiveness and reconciliation between enemies.

ENG 226.3 (Online) FANTASY AND SPECULATIVE FICTION

T1 and T2  (TBA)

Non-category

This course examines literary genres that explore alternative worlds, experiment with the bounds of the real, and challenge the norms of reading. The course moves from precursors in legend, folktale, and romance, to Victorian fantasy, science fiction, utopian and dystopian fiction, and late twentieth-century feminist revisionary narratives.

ENG 230.3 (61) LITERATURE FOR CHILDREN

T1  TR 11:30 (Kylie-Anne Hingston)

Non-category

Children’s literature is a unique genre in that its primary defining feature is its audience rather than its subject matter. In this course, we will uncover what defining features make this genre’s texts for children rather than for readers in general, and we will explore what those features tell us about how childhood is culturally understood. To investigate these questions, we will learn about the history and development of children’s literature from hornbooks to teen dystopias. Starting with folk and fairy tales from which children’s literature germinated, as well as short pieces from seventeenth- and eighteenth-century reading primers, we move on to cover picturebooks, chapterbooks, and novels published between the nineteenth- and twenty-first centuries for an audience of children or young adults. Students will encounter familiar characters, such as Peter Rabbit (Potter) and the “Wild Things” (Sendak), but will also be introduced to new ones, including a selfish porcelain rabbit who learns how to love (DiCamillo’s Edward from The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane) and a fugitive teen being hunted for his bone marrow (Dimaline’s Frenchie from The Marrow Thieves).

ENG 232.3 (02) GOTHIC NARRATIVE

T2 TR 11:30 (Kathleen James-Cavan)

Non-category

Take this course if you dare! You will encounter such horrors as lascivious monks and nuns, demon lovers, genii, vampires, disintegrating castles, and ghouls. Although dismissed in the eighteenth century as absurd and feared to vitiate the mind, Gothic narrative has proved to be undead. Arising first in Horace Walpole’s Gothic mansion at Strawberry Hill, tales of terror continue to dominate popular culture in films, video games, and TV series. In this course we will trace both the politics and poetics of the Gothic in an attempt to account for the pleasures of fear. We will explore such noble ruins as The Castle of Otranto, The Mysteries of Udolpho, and The Monk, in addition to selected short fiction by such writers as Poe, Le Fanu, Lovecraft, Faulkner and Carter. A contemporary gothic work will be selected by the class.

ENG 242.3 (Online) INDIGENOUS STORYTELLING OF THE PRAIRIES

T1  (TBA)

Category 4, Canadian 

This course examines Indigenous literatures from the prairie region of Canada, providing students with knowledge of the terms and issues central to an engaged study of Indigenous literatures. Topics to be covered include the art of storytelling; the relationship between oral and written literatures; collaborative storytelling; untold stories, including stories of racism and oppression; cultural and individual trauma; and resistance and recovery. The course also provides students with knowledge of historical and political contexts specific to the prairies.

ENG 242.3 (02) INDIGENOUS STORYTELLING OF THE PRAIRIES

T2  MWF 12:30 (TBA)

Category 4, Canadian 

This course examines Indigenous literatures from the prairie region of Canada, providing students with knowledge of the terms and issues central to an engaged study of Indigenous literatures. Topics to be covered include the art of storytelling; the relationship between oral and written literatures; collaborative storytelling; untold stories, including stories of racism and oppression; cultural and individual trauma; and resistance and recovery. The course also provides students with knowledge of historical and political contexts specific to the prairies.

ENG 246.3 (01) SHORT FICTION

T1  MWF  1:30  (Ludmilla Voitkovska)

Non-category

As a relatively new genre, the short story is a truly modern form. Its attractiveness has to do with the concision of its form and the possibilities for startling turns its narrative can offer. The course will explore the history and conventions of short fiction from its origins in myth, fable, and folktale to its flourishing in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It will examine stories from a variety of cultural contexts representing a range of styles, themes and social issues. Among authors studied will be Aesop, Chekhov, Maupassant, Kafka, Munro, Achebe, Poe, Joyce, Conrad, Faulkner, and Chopin.

ENG 254.6 (01) CANADIAN SPECULATIVE FICTION

T1  MWF 10:30  (Kevin Flynn)

Non-category, Canadian

In this course we will study Canadian literature from a somewhat unusual angle: by reading works of science fiction. If you think that all Canadian literature is about rocks, rivers, and trees, you may be in for a surprise. Our goal: to grapple with the assigned texts on their own merits AND to consider ways in which their visions of alternate worlds comport with and/or contradict the worlds represented in more traditional Canadian literature.

ENG 277.3 (61) LITERARY USES OF MYTHOLOGY

T1 MWF 8:30  (Sarah Powrie)  

Non-category

Sallust describes myth as “things that never happened but always are.” His enigmatic statement prompts us to consider the power of mythic narrative: why would stories about imaginary people continue to fascinate us and resonate with our own experience? Using Ovid’s Metamorphoses as a point of departure, we will study the many ways in which Ovid’s tales of transformation were themselves transformed through poetry, film and visual art to express the anxieties and aspirations of an array or authors. Among the various cultural iterations to be included are: Orpheus in the German poetry of Rainer Maria Rilke, the textual labyrinths of the Argentinian writer Jorge Luis Borges, and Narcissus in the media theory of Marshall McLuhan.

ENG 277.3 (Online) LITERARY USES OF MYTHOLOGY

T2 (TBA) 

Non-category

This course introduces the theory of myth and selected examples of the classical and other myths most frequently adapted and reinterpreted in literature in English. It emphasizes the ways in which different writers can find different significances in the same myth.

ENG 282.3 (61) FEMINIST CRITICAL THEORY AND LITERATURE BY WOMEN

T1  TR 1:00  (Cynthia Wallace) 

Non-category 

“You must write, and read, as if your life depended on it,” claims Adrienne Rich in What Is Found There: Notebooks on Poetry and Politics. In this course, we will seek to tell a story of women’s writing that has participated in this urgency. How, for instance, did Julian of Norwich, writing in the fourteenth century, Amelia Lanyer writing in the seventeenth, Elizabeth Barrett Browning writing in the nineteenth, and Virginia Woolf writing in the twentieth century not only write their own lives into being but also invite both readers and later writers into a similar project? We will trace a history that stretches back to the medieval period even as we focus particularly on fiction, poetry, and theoretical texts of the last fifty years, reading writers such as Toni Morrison, Gloria Anzaldúa, bell hooks, Judith Butler, Chimamanda Adichie, and Katherena Vermette.

ENG 284.3 (62) BEOWULF AND TALES OF NORTHERN HEROES

T2 TR 10:00 (Michael Cichon)

Non-category

Dragon-slaying heroes and the Valkyries who loved them! Outlaws afraid of the dark (and the living dead who inhabit it)! An angry poet with an unusually large head who knew how to fight AND write poetry (and lift curses and hoodwink royalty)! Read the stories that inspired Tolkien, A Game of Thrones and American Gods. Oh, we’ll also read American Gods. Perhaps more formally, ENG 284 is a study of Beowulf in Modern English Translation, including extensive consideration of its cultural and literary backgrounds, and readings in related or pertinent heroic narratives, primarily of North Germanic origin.

ENG 288.3 (02) INTRODUCTION TO FILM

T2  TR 10:00 – Lab R 4:00 (Tasha Hubbard) 

Category 5 

Students will learn the basic vocabulary and key concepts of film studies. Selected exemplary works from the history of film will be read to introduce concepts such as film aesthetics, sound design, film as narrative, film’s role in culture, and the evolving documentary. Films have been chosen with an emphasis on independent cinema, including Indigenous cinema. We will learn to “read” films in a way akin to the reading of literary texts—and with a critical eye, remembering, as Robin Wood has said, “film, like literature, ought to be intelligent about life.”

ENG 294.3 (01) TECHNIQUES OF CANADIAN POETRY

T1  T 6:00 – (Jeanette Lynes) 

Non-category

Imagine that poetry is a conversation, often an argument. What kinds of conversations do Canada’s poets have with their forbearers? With their contemporaries? With themselves? With the landscapes or cultural spaces around them? How did these spaces inform the evolving craft of poetry in Canada? Who read poetry in Canada? Who reads it today? This course will consider key currents and cross-currents that have informed Canadian poetry to the present day. The cultural contexts of poetic production in Canada will be examined as well as the various projects with which Canadian poets have been engaged, using poetry as a lens for examining, to cite only a few examples, the environment, place, gender, race, colonialism, experimental poetics, and the nature of language itself. The course will consider the reading audiences of poetry and the impact of performance poetry as well as the platforms for disseminating poetry such as the critical role played by small magazines and presses, and anthologies.