Junior English

Please note:

  • 6 cu 100-level English is the maximum that can be taken for credit, with the exception of ENG 120 Introduction to Creative Writing, which may be taken for an additional 3-cu general credit.
  • 6 cu at the 100 level is a prerequisite for 200-level English classes.

ENG 110.6 Literature and Composition

An introduction to the main kinds of literature. In addition to learning the tools of critical analysis, students will study and practise composition.


ENG 111.3 Literature and Composition: Reading Poetry

The course emphasizes close reading of poetry with due attention to questions of form and technique and social and cultural contexts. The material may range from medieval to modern.


ENG 112.3 Literature and Composition: Reading Drama

The course emphasizes close reading of plays with due attention to questions of their performance and social and cultural contexts. The material may range from medieval to modern drama, including works written for radio, film, and television.


ENG 113.3 Literature and Composition: Reading Narrative

The course focuses on reading critically a variety of narrative forms.


ENG 114.3 Literature and Composition: Reading Culture

Students will draw on their own range of cultural experiences—popular as well as academic—in order to enhance their literary knowledge and their communication skills. Since language and literature are central to the production and consumption of culture, students will work with and beyond well-known texts. Students will learn how literary models, terms, and techniques both shape and help us to understand a broad range of historical and contemporary cultural forms. Works may be included from a variety of historical and/or contemporary media, visual and virtual as well as textual. 

Sample of Course Descriptions

ENG 114 (02) – Literature and Science - L. Banco

Let’s start with what this course is not: it is not a science course, nor is it a course on science fiction, nor is it only a course on literature. Instead, it will introduce students to a range of cultural experiences—“popular” as well as “high-brow”—that have to do with science. Many of these cultural experiences will be literary, but some will involve popular writing, film, television, and photography. There are three main objectives to this course. First, students will learn about different ways of understanding science through a broad range of cultural production. Second, students will learn some of the tools of academic analysis and will use those tools to examine how these cultural experiences work. We will practice this kind of analysis in class, but the third aim of this course will be to practice this analysis in writing; this course will involve instruction in composition, and students will be expected to write essays about these various cultural productions.

ENG 114 (03) S. Brazier-Tompkins

Students will draw on their own range of cultural experiences – popular as well as academic – in order to enhance their literary knowledge and their communication skills.  Since language and literature are central to the production and consumption of culture, students will work with and beyond well-known texts.  Students will learn how literary models, terms, and techniques both shape and help us to understand a broad range of historical and contemporary cultural forms.  The focus of this section is on relationships.  Here, we will examine how personal relationships motivate and influence individuals, how cultural relationships motivate individual and group behaviour, and how our own immersion in relationship and culture influences our understandings of and reactions to the texts we read, the people we meet, and the world around us.  This study of fiction, game, drama, and poetry will help students to develop skills in English language composition, critical analysis, and reading comprehension.

ENG 114 (04), (10) Politics and Culture - J. Stothers

This course examines political culture as revealed in English-language literature since the Renaissance.

ENG 114 (09), (11) R. Anderson

This class will allow students to draw on their own range of cultural experiences—popular as well as academic—in order to enhance both their literary knowledge and their communication skills. We will examine how warrior culture has been represented in English literature by considering both the elements that persist and those that have evolved over time. The warrior code is based on loyalty, generosity, and bravery, and the warrior is motivated by a quest for honour, glory, fame, and power; yet the celebration of warrior culture is not without critics. Through novels, short stories and poems we will explore competing notions of honour, changing values, and questions of gender and class.

ENG 114 (12), Reading Culture: Literature and Music - S. Hardy

For good reasons - but also for some historically random reasons - universities typically treat literature and music as separate artistic and academic categories. Writers and musicians themselves, however, are often deeply concerned with connections between these arts. In this class we will explore the fascinating interplay between word and song. Many writers, we will learn, are highly attentive to the "musicality" of their writing, sometimes applying to their work sophisticated musical strategies. Musicians, on the other hand, often strive to lend their music referential dimensions, frameworks of meaning, which can only be conveyed through language. The course will offer a brief historical survey of the music-literary relationship, primarily in literary texts - poetry, music lyrics, prose and fiction - but also in a small selection of folk, classic and contemporary music. Along the way our skills in textual and musical analysis, and essay composition, will be assessed and developed.

ENG 114 (61) K. Hingston

In this section of Reading Culture, we will focus on reading representations of disability in culture. Although disability is still often seen as a medical issue (as a physical or mental problem to be corrected or controlled), disability activists, artists, and scholars have been challenging that view since the 1970s. They argue that disability is a social issue, or as Simi Linton puts it, that disability is “the effect of an environment hostile to some bodies and not to others, requiring advances in social justice rather than medicine.” In this class, we will apply the perspective and theories of these activists and scholars to analyze how disability is represented and understood in our culture—in ads, television, film, videos, poetry, short stories, and novels.

 


ENG 120.3 Introduction to Creative Writing

This course introduces students to strategies for writing original fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction.