Drawing

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The Painting and Drawing areas are integrated and form the largest studio area with three and one-half full time faculty and numerous sessional and graduate student instructors. The faculty as a whole offers significant diversity and range in professional background, training and artistic directions.

The Painting and Drawing area strives to provide a curriculum which facilitates traditional and non-traditional approaches, with an emphasis on technical processes, conceptual and theoretical awareness, understanding, expertise and development. Students in Painting and Drawing courses are expected to develop a capacity to work independently; to analyze their own and others work; to understand their own areas of research; to demonstrate experimentation and investigation in a wide range of concepts and media; and to express and articulate their work verbally, technically and conceptually. The Painting and Drawing faculty are keenly interested in the flucuating debates within the realm of contemporary art and attempt to keep students informed about current, historic and contemporary art practices and concerns. Studio course instruction utilizes projects, demonstrations, critique sessions, slide presentations, video screenings and practical working studio time.

Classes in Drawing are taught in a large studio classroom on the first level of the Department facilities in the Murray Building. Windows provide natural light on one side and wall space is available for critiques and display. Adjoining the drawing studio is a student locker and storage area. The studio accomodates classes of 28 students with individual easels and/or drawing horses and a central still life and model area.

For the current list of course offerings, see the Dynamic Schedule

Painting

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The Painting and Drawing areas are integrated and form the largest studio area with three and one-half full time faculty and numerous sessional and graduate student instructors. The faculty as a whole offers significant diversity and range in professional background, training and artistic directions.

The Painting and Drawing area strives to provide a curriculum which facilitates traditional and non-traditional approaches, with an emphasis on technical processes, conceptual and theoretical awareness, understanding, expertise and development. Students in Painting and Drawing courses are expected to develop a capacity to work independently; to analyze their own and others work; to understand their own areas of research; to demonstrate experimentation and investigation in a wide range of concepts and media; and to express and articulate their work verbally, technically and conceptually. The Painting and Drawing faculty are keenly interested in the flucuating debates within the realm of contemporary art and attempt to keep students informed about current, historic and contemporary art practices and concerns. Studio course instruction utilizes projects, demonstrations, critique sessions, slide presentations, video screenings and practical working studio time.

Classes in Painting are taught in a large studio classroom on thesecond level of the Department facilities in the Murray Building. Windows provide natural light on one side and wall space is available for critiques and display. Adjoining the painting studio are faculty offices, a tutorial classroom, a spray booth, storage shelving and small individual studio spaces for upper year students. The studio accomodates classes of 27 students with individual easels and and a still life and model area.

For the current list of course offerings, see the Dynamic Schedule

Printmaking

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The principal aim of the Printmaking area is to inform, challenge and assist students conceptually and artistically as well as providing the technical skills that are required to create high quality original print images. Print media that are taught include intaglio, monotypes, relief, lithography, screen printing and digital imaging. In addition to the core print media, students are encouraged to explore and experiment with changing technologies, photographic printmaking processes, mixed media, alternative printmaking, the books arts, installations, animation, and interdisciplinary projects.

Printmaking is a hybrid medium that embraces diverse working methods. The print is a vibrant contemporary vehicle for artistic expression, the dissemination of meaningful ideas, as well as critical discourse. Community develops as students help one another as they share studio space, presses, ink and equipment. All prints created in our studios are done with methods and techniques that are safer for both the printmaker & the environment. This best practice of creating printed art is designed as environmentally responsible art-making. 

Our fully equipped, spacious and sunlit studios are dedicated, interconnected studios. The facility is managed by area faculty and a full time technician. Instruction is given in 6 distinct studio spaces in Room 64 of the Murray Building. The learning environment includes:

1. Intaglio and Relief Printmaking Studio (with letterpress)

2. Screen printing Studio

3. Lithography Printmaking Studio

4. Darkroom (servicing the three studio areas above)

5. Digital Media Suite

6. Presentation, critique and class meeting area

Printmaking courses also offers important activities which expand on course content. These include multiple exhibition opportunities such as the annual Senior Printmaking Show in the Snelgrove Gallery, and the Print Show + Sale in the Place Riel University Centre. Equally important activities include visiting print artists talks and workshops, visits to local printmaking studios, art collections and galleries, print portfolio exchanges, and collaborative student projects.

For the current list of course offerings, see the Dynamic Schedule

Photography

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The Photography and Digital Media program has an emphasis on conceptual development and technical mastery within the context of awareness and understanding of critical theory. The curriculum guides students towards an understanding of relationships between concept, technique and critical theory in their development of a personal art process

The studio classes in Photography are all delivered in a similar manner. Students are shown examples of work by historic and contemporary artists and the context and critical concerns of the artists work is discussed. Workshops and demonstrations are used to provide technical information. Critiques and peer discussion provide feedback for the students. The Digital Imaging course focuses on conceptual and technical development of the students work in digital media. Primarily, the Adobe Photoshop software is used to introduce photomontage and image manipulation techniques. Critical and theoretical concerns in contemporary visual art, technology and imaging processes are an integral part of the course.

The main Photography area is located on the first level of the Department facilities in the Murray Building and consists of a classroom/studio, a darkroom facility, a central workspace and faculty office. A colour darkroom is located in the lower level of the Physics building and is used mainly be graduate students. A small new media suite located on the Department's second level supports scanning and printing activity. The Digital Imaging introductory course is held in an Arts and Science computer lab located in the Thorvaldson Building.

For the current list of course offerings, see the Dynamic Schedule

Sculpture

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The Sculpture and Extended Media curriculum objectives provide students with a solid introduction to these studio art practices. An understanding of three dimensional design is a crucial part of any studio program and an appreciation for contemporary interdisciplinary practices is grounded in both sculpture and combined-media explorations emphasized in Extended Media.

Emphasis at all levels of Sculpture and Extended Media is on contemporary art practices. Exposure to artists working in these media is regularly provided by slide lectures, videotapes, student seminar presentations and gallery visits.

The Sculpture Foundation course provides an overview of 3-dimensional work in fine art, architecture, design and craft; the principles and elements of design are discussed and explored in a series of studio projects. Instructor-guided projects continue to form the basis for experimentation in the 200-level courses, witha focus on exposing students to a range of materials, techniques and conceptual considerations. At the 300-level students may choose to follow instructor-led projects or propose their own plan of study. Students at the 400-level most frequently work on self-designed proposals. Group critiques are held on a regular basis throughout the semester to provide students with feedback from both the instructor and their peers. Teaching in the Extended Media courses encompasses a variety of studio practices that do not fit conventional disiplinary categories. These have included collaborative and site-specific works, public art interventions, bookworks, performance, installation, video and audio works.

The facility for Sculpture is located in the Research Annex building, a recently renovated space across campus from the rest of the Department's undergraduate facilities. The studio consists of one large open workspace and four smaller separate rooms and supports woodworking, plaster-casting, sandblasting, waxworks, welding, kilns for firing clay and bronze casting, in addition to classroom, office and storage space. The studio is managed by faculty instructors and a technician. Audio/visual production equipment is available to Extended Media courses, which utilize a number of non-specific spaces in addition to the Sculpture facility.

For the current list of course offerings, see the Dynamic Schedule